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Posted by daestrom on April 11, 2010, 1:42 pm
 


Energy Guy wrote:

Raising the voltage with a transformer would not push REAL power around
the loop.  It would just cause reactive power to flow.  And kwh meters
don't care about that.

It's what is sometimes referred to as a four-terminal network.  You have
an inductance between the two supplies and all you'll get is reactive
current flow.  Transmission line theory.

daestrom

Posted by Josepi on April 13, 2010, 4:17 am
 


This is not true.
The current flow is created by two components. The supply voltage and the
nature of the load.

The supply voltage on the secondary of the transformer will be in phase with
the primary of the transformer.

The current will be drawn according to the load connected. The load
connected is two meter current elements and some copper wire between the
houses (in the neighbour meter case). These are not long distance
transmission lines and may not usually represent a very large inductive
component. Some unity PF ballast may be required to improve PF.


Meter test boards use a low transformer secondary voltage and swamp the
circuit with low resistance unity PF ballast loads to correct the current
through the current element as close as possible to unity.

The potential supply to the potential coil parts of each meter element are
phase corrected/matched  by varying the phase input of it's primary. This
typically done by a variac between the two phases. While the voltage supply
for the current loading transformer could be from an Ean (Er-g) phasing, the
primary of the potential coil supply could be varied from phase from Eab to
Eac (Er-w to Er-b for the Hydro One types) variably over 60 degrees. This
would not be the case or available for our "live" application.

In the case of the neighbour's meter feed (not the best) the LV secondary of
the "loading transformer" would be in a loop from the load side of the
neighbour's meter to the loadside of the PV meter and return via the common
grid connection. We only need to have enough resistance in the circuit to
make an "in-phase" component that will register on the kWh PV meter.


In a discussion some years ago and you argued for real power flow by
adjusting voltages levels between two systems, contrary to what others were
telling you. Now you are stating there would be only reactive flowing
through the meters, similar to what happens in a HV transmission system.



Raising the voltage with a transformer would not push REAL power around
the loop.  It would just cause reactive power to flow.  And kwh meters
don't care about that.

It's what is sometimes referred to as a four-terminal network.  You have
an inductance between the two supplies and all you'll get is reactive
current flow.  Transmission line theory.

daestrom



Posted by Guido on April 11, 2010, 4:44 am
 

Energy Guy wrote:


When the meter reader comes by to read the meter, he discovers the hook
up to your neighbor and rats you out.


Posted by Energy Guy on April 11, 2010, 1:14 pm
 

Guido wrote:


He wouldn't see the hookup because it would be under ground, between our
houses directly from one basement to another, and our meters are on
opposite sides of our houses.

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