Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

A question about coil winding - Page 41

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Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 22, 2009, 12:10 am
 



I'd wind the coil on a 2-piece removeable hardwood bobbin on the South
Bend metal lathe in back gear, but that didn't seem like a realistic
suggestion to the OP.

jsw

Posted by Josepi on December 22, 2009, 1:09 pm
 


I doubt anybody can wind a coil in the air, even if it is their hand. It is
still a winding form or jig.


I'd wind the coil on a 2-piece removeable hardwood bobbin on the South
Bend metal lathe in back gear, but that didn't seem like a realistic
suggestion to the OP.

jsw


The zig-zag is not recommended for enamel insulated wire as it puts a lot of
mechanical stress on wire insulation crossing each other, the resultant is
bulky, not as flexible and cannot be formed into the laminations after
winding.


You can wind a bobbinless, free-standing coil by hand by zig-zaging
.....



Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 22, 2009, 7:36 pm
 


I used a piece of cardboard rolled into a tube, which could be
squeezed smaller to remove the finished coil.

You can make a close-wound flat spiral of wire completely freehand by
holding it between your finger and thumb at the point where the wire
enters the spiral and working around a little at a time. I learned
that from a sidewalk jewelry maker in Heidelberg. It goes better if
you pull the tinned solid copper wire hard enough to permanently
stretch it a little. This removes the kinks and leaves it very
straight and somewhat work-hardened.

jsw

Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 6, 2009, 3:26 pm
 


I would assemble the motor shaft and bearings and use it as the coil
winder. #36 wire isn't that bad, try a headband magnifier and enough
drag on the coil and the spool it feeds from that you can let go of
the wire. You can practice with fishline to avoid kinking the wire.
There's a good reason why clever experimenters have done the job the
same way for the last 100 years.

Then again not everyone has the patience and skill to be a lab tech,
many good engineers included. Job security for me.

If you wind the wires in parallel and then connect them in series
Josepi got it right, the outer end of each wire has to connect to the
inner start of the next, so the current flows in the same direction
through all of them.

If each individual winding has say 100V across it then the voltages at
the inner ends of your 6 wires will be 0V, 100V, 200V, 300V, 400V, and
500V. The 0V wire will be beside the 500V wire on the next turn 012345|
012345|012345 or at least cross it in the next layer.

jsw

Posted by amdx on December 6, 2009, 1:50 am
 



 Litz wire, used in RF circuits to reduce resistance.
http://www.mwswire.com/litzmain.htm
Example; 175 strands of #40 wire.

      Number Of
      Strands Individual Strand Size
      (AWG) Circular Mils
      Nominal Nearest AWG Equivalent
      (Based on Circular Mils) DC Resistance - Nominal
      (ohms / kft @ 20C)
      175 40 1681.75 18 6.17

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

      LITZ Wire Type
     Nom. Mean O.D.
      (Inches)
     Feet per Pound
     Pounds per 1000 ft.

      Unserved Single Polyurethane 0.054 183 5.46
      Unserved Heavy Polyurethane 0.058 179 5.59
      Served Single Nylon-Single Polyurethane 0.056 180 5.56



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Number Of
      Strands Individual Strand Size
      (AWG) Circular Mils
      Nominal Nearest AWG Equivalent
      (Based on Circular Mils) DC Resistance - Nominal
      (ohms / kft @ 20C)
      60 36 1500 18.5 6.91

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

      LITZ Wire Type
     Nom. Mean O.D.
      (Inches)
     Feet per Pound
     Pounds per 1000 ft.

      Unserved Single Polyurethane 0.05 212 4.72
      Unserved Heavy Polyurethane 0.054 208 4.81
      Served Single Nylon-Single Polyurethane 0.052 208 4.81



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Number Of
      Strands Individual Strand Size
      (AWG) Circular Mils
      Nominal Nearest AWG Equivalent
      (Based on Circular Mils) DC Resistance - Nominal
      (ohms / kft @ 20C)
      150 40 1441.5 18.5 7.19

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

      LITZ Wire Type
     Nom. Mean O.D.
      (Inches)
     Feet per Pound
     Pounds per 1000 ft.

      Unserved Single Polyurethane 0.05 213 4.7
      Unserved Heavy Polyurethane 0.054 209 4.79
      Served Single Nylon-Single Polyurethane 0.052 209 4.78



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Number Of
      Strands Individual Strand Size
      (AWG) Circular Mils
      Nominal Nearest AWG Equivalent
      (Based on Circular Mils) DC Resistance - Nominal
      (ohms / kft @ 20C)
      175 41 1372 18.5 7.56

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

      LITZ Wire Type
     Nom. Mean O.D.
      (Inches)
     Feet per Pound
     Pounds per 1000 ft.

      Unserved Single Polyurethane 0.047 231 4.33
      Unserved Heavy Polyurethane 0.052 227 4.41
      Served Single Nylon-Single Polyurethane 0.05 226 4.42



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