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Continuous Motion based on Newtonian Physics

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Posted by NathanCoppedge on July 18, 2011, 9:10 pm
 
I have long been interested in exceptions to the rule.

Now I may have found it:

A ball weight may be supported by a fixed track, reducing energy required
to lift it along a slope.

When the ball weight reaches a position where it has gained some height,
the track can be eliminated, so that the full weight of the ball bears on
the lever.

So [1] the ball weight moves by leverage from a counter-weight up a slope

[2] the ball weight through this portion is supported partially by a fixed
track, which may be angled or beveled to hold part of the ball

[3] the ball weight moves to a position of LESSER leverage, but WITH
SIGNIFICANT WEIGHT

[4] the ball weight drops to the original position

[5] a note: downwards slope may be acquired in relation to the slight
upwards slope of the fixed track, e.g. downwards and then upwards from the
point of drop, remains level with the return position AT THE TIME OF
RETURN, BUT NOT AT THE TIME OF THE INITIAL DROP.

The above 5 instances seem to support a very simple perpetual energy
device.

Comment on specifics if you think that I'm wrong. Try to speak in my terms.

For example, it cannot be denied that [A] a counterweight can move a ball
weight on a fixed track, or either that [B] a ball weight is partially
supported on such a track or either that [C] such a differential requires
only a method of operation.



-------------------------------------




Posted by Jim Rojas on July 18, 2011, 9:14 pm
 
NathanCoppedge wrote:

Build a working model. I would like to see a Youtube video of you work.

Jim Rojas

Posted by Jim Wilkins on July 19, 2011, 1:21 am
 On Jul 18, 5:10pm, drypress_at_yahoo_dot_...@foo.com (NathanCoppedge)
wrote:

http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/museum/overbal.htm


Posted by Jim Wilkins on July 19, 2011, 2:16 am
 
Lest you think your idea is original, here is a practical application
(in reverse) from 1808:


jsw

Posted by Jim Wilkins on July 19, 2011, 12:37 pm
 On Jul 18, 5:10pm, drypress_at_yahoo_dot_...@foo.com (NathanCoppedge)
wrote:

There's your flaw. A static force doesn't consume energy, unless it's
from your muscles.

jsw

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