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Electrical heat gain - Page 2

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Posted by danny burstein on April 13, 2009, 1:54 am
 
writes:


In a typical residence or office, over 98 or so percent of the
electricity going into the room, regardless of what it's used
for,  eventually turns to heat. The number is generally closer
to 100 percent than that, but some does "escape", so to speak,
as light going out through the windows.  

There's only one use in a "regular" situation that would
lead to a lower number, and that's charging up a battery.
In a decent system, you might put as much as half or
even 3/4 of the electrity into "storage", and then
physically carry it out of there. (But remember that
your cellphone or even yur laptop only accounts for a
small amount of the power going into the room).

--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
             dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]

Posted by Eeyore on April 13, 2009, 6:19 pm
 


danny burstein wrote:


But the 'wasted' energy heats the battery. It's been converted to ( rather
unhelpful )
thermal energy.

Graham


Posted by Eeyore on April 13, 2009, 6:18 pm
 

"Fred F." wrote:


It doesn't matter if the source is electricity or not.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservation_of_energy

Graham



Posted by Curbie on April 13, 2009, 3:01 am
 
After you know the answer, it is simple and obvious once you think
about it, if the electrical device is inside your house the
electricity it uses eventually is turned into heat gain. Wouldn't your
heat pump example hold true for outside AC compressors too, the
electricity is used outside but the results (cool in this example)
effect inside temperature (negative heat gain)?

I too saved your Soldering to aluminum post. (Thanks for that, and...)

Thanks for reminding me to look both ways before crossing the street.

Curbie



Posted by Eeyore on April 13, 2009, 6:23 pm
 

Curbie wrote:


Heat pumps are quite a different matter. They 'transport' heat from one
place to another.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pump

Additionally say if required for heating, the energy input can also be used
to heat the premises due to the law of conservation of energy.

Also read about CoP.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pump#Efficiency

Graham



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