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Emergency, safe, alternative low-budget heat for apartment? - Page 5

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Posted by SolutionsDIY on December 4, 2021, 6:41 am
 


 lol.  Good thing I have a couple of thin duvets.  But I also have a
medium-thick comforter, along with a couple of winter coats.  I think
sleeping may be okay.

*************************************************
The windows will be the next thing to address.

I did buy window plastic in the past from the hardware store.  I know
these work as I used the technique below for 3 whole years in my old
apartment.

The only thing I modified was how I put the window plastic up.  The
tape provided in the kits is completely useless, esp. when you're
applying when the wall surfaces are cold (like when you're having to
insulate the windows after the cold sets in the first time).

What I used instead of the tape was my own solution - I cut out an
unfolded file folder into a continuous 1/2 "spiral" continous
rectangle and just folded up each "corner" to end up with a long ½
inch strip of cardstock!  I rolled this up into a roll which was then
easy to apply, as follows ...

I used the tape that comes with the plastic to just temporarily hold
the plastic in place.  Then I went and unrolled the strip and placed
near the end of the window plastic and started stapling and unrolling
the stirip and then stapling.  I found that I had to space the staples
no more than 1½ inches apart, or so!

This works really, really well and would withstand the poorly
insulated windows in my old apartment which building management
refused to fix as the entire apartment complex had serious window
drafts.  And this plastic would hold up the ¼ foot, or thereabouts, of
ice that would gather along the bottom after a warm spell created
condensation inside.

Like I said, I had 3 entire years of experience with this type of
window plasict I never had a problem with my stapled plastic.


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Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 4, 2021, 4:18 pm
 
"SolutionsDIY"  wrote in message  
.................
The windows will be the next thing to address.

-------------

I hunted down the air leaks in an older apartment with a helium balloon  
ballasted to neutral buoyancy. It rose up at the gas stove (the only heat),  
crossed the ceiling, and rushed down alarmingly fast where cold air was  
leaking in, then floated back a few feet above the floor on the cold layer.  
Helium won't explode like hydrogen but the plastic will melt if you let it  
be drawn into a hot surface.

A variation for rubber balloons that slowly leak is to dampen attached paper  
for decreasing ballast. Mylar holds the gas longer.

Tape sticks to woodwork better than to wallpaper though the residue may be  
difficult to clean off later. Your staples are probably the most secure if  
you can get away with them. I was very careful not to do anything I couldn't  
undo, but when I came back for my deposit the landlady had stripped and was  
refinishing the place. She was good at it, too.

It was the third floor in a two story neighborhood and fully exposed to the  
wind. I measured 45F in the winter there, and 105F in the summer. I still  
felt lucky to find it, for its low rent, parking and clothesline in a barely  
affordable city.


Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 4, 2021, 6:46 pm
 "SolutionsDIY"  wrote in message  

I used the tape that comes with the plastic to just temporarily hold
the plastic in place.  Then I went and unrolled the strip and placed
near the end of the window plastic and started stapling and unrolling
the stirip and then stapling.  I found that I had to space the staples
no more than 1½ inches apart, or so!

--------------------

When building theatre scenery I learned to  staple the canvas across the  
middle of the flat, then at the centers of the ends, and finally work along  
both edges into each corner. The canvas shrinks and tightens when sized but  
not enough to remove wrinkles.  


Posted by SolutionsDIY on December 7, 2021, 6:12 pm
 On Sat, 4 Dec 2021 13:46:03 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"


Good tip to keep extremely taut while stapling.  Will keep that in
mind to try as I got a tiny bit too much slack in places which got
worse after condensation when the icing up happened and put weight on
the plastic.  It held every year, but it's alarming to see a pouch of
ice nearly one foot into your living room buldging from the window!



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Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 8, 2021, 1:37 am
 "SolutionsDIY"  wrote in message  

Good tip to keep extremely taut while stapling.  Will keep that in
mind to try as I got a tiny bit too much slack in places which got
worse after condensation when the icing up happened and put weight on
the plastic.  It held every year, but it's alarming to see a pouch of
ice nearly one foot into your living room buldging from the window!

-------------------

That ice comes from the humid indoor air. After stapling the plastic for  
strength you could try sealing its edges with tape. Seal only the innermost,  
warmest layer, let the outer ones breathe.


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