Hybrid Car ‚Äď More Fun with Less Gas

Has anyone seen a steam engine/electric battery hybrid vehicle? - Page 11

register ::  Login Password  :: Lost Password?
Posted by residualselfimage1999 on June 5, 2009, 1:23 am
 

That makes me think of steampunk
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steampunk  )
and  the japanese anime movie "Steamboy"
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steamboy )

coming back to reality ...
steam energy is just compressed gas. a
simplier solution would be to create a hybrid that runs on
compressed air - of which there is a (british-french venture)
company which is working on such a solution....

Motor Developement International Enterprise
http://www.mdi.lu/english/

They have a prototype called an airpod that uses compressed air
http://www.mdi.lu/english/airpod.php

The motor /compressed air technology is described here
http://www.mdi.lu/english/moteurs.php









 .

Posted by Joesepi on June 5, 2009, 2:23 am
 
What would supply the energy to compress the air and why would we not just
run that energy source a directlly as possible to avoid more energy losses
in an inefficient  storage system?


That makes me think of steampunk
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steampunk  )
and  the japanese anime movie "Steamboy"
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steamboy )

coming back to reality ...
steam energy is just compressed gas. a
simplier solution would be to create a hybrid that runs on
compressed air - of which there is a (british-french venture)
company which is working on such a solution....

Motor Developement International Enterprise
http://www.mdi.lu/english/

They have a prototype called an airpod that uses compressed air
http://www.mdi.lu/english/airpod.php

The motor /compressed air technology is described here
http://www.mdi.lu/english/moteurs.php









 .



Posted by residualselfimage1999 on June 5, 2009, 10:14 am
 
The goal/advantage would be to pressurize the air so
the its energy density would be greater than the
fuel source that it replace. When this is accomplished
one can achieve the ultimate reward - a high density
energy source coupled with an extremely efficient,
simple and reliable engine/motor . One of the barriers to
making a EV - is that while electric motors are simplier
and more efficient than than gasoline/diesel engines
- the energy density of the best EV fuel cells are about
1/3 to that of a petrol based one.  So any efficiency
gained from having a lighter more efficient engine/motor
is lost because the increase weight of the energy source.
By changing engine performance and lowering the
overall vehicle mass  a conventional diesel/gas cars to
get between 60 to 100 mpg - yes - they go a bit slower
( 0-60 mph in 15 seconds) they can not go as
fast maybe ( top out at 85 mph ) - but they get
60 to 100 mpg.  So where do they exist?  Well
you have to go to the Europe or Japan....

here are two examples that I know of.

2005-2009 Toyota Aygo (Japan/UK/Europe) - a conventional 4 door sedan
using a 3 cylinder diesel, about 65 mpg
   ( sister cars = Peugeot 107 and Citron C1 )
   see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Aygo

2010 Axon hatchback (UK) - a 2 seater hatchback, carbon fiber chassis,
gasoline engine, claimed 100 mpg
   ( btw this vehicle is an entry into the Automotive X-Prize Contest
for best most practical commuter car)
   see http://www.axonautomotive.com/cars.html


Jeromy Clarkson of BBC's Top Gear ( a UK auto review TV show)
criticizes
electric vehicles, HeVs, and PHEV and because of the high cost and
low energy density  of batteries ( which means extra weight and lower
range)
He prefers using either a conventional diesel or gasoline engine to
power a
vehicle.



nglish/moteurs.php

Posted by user on June 5, 2009, 1:23 pm
 residualselfimage1999@gmail.com wrote:

airhttp://www.mdi.lu/english/airpod.php

herehttp://www.mdi.lu/english/moteurs.php


Nah, you need one of these:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/24/Morgan_Super_Sports_1937.jpg

or the modern equiv...:
http://thekneeslider.com/archives/2006/11/30/ace-cycle-car-from-liberty-motors/

Posted by daestrom on June 5, 2009, 3:57 pm
 

The goal/advantage would be to pressurize the air so
the its energy density would be greater than the
fuel source that it replace. When this is accomplished
one can achieve the ultimate reward - a high density
energy source coupled with an extremely efficient,
simple and reliable engine/motor . One of the barriers to
making a EV - is that while electric motors are simplier
and more efficient than than gasoline/diesel engines
- the energy density of the best EV fuel cells are about
1/3 to that of a petrol based one.  So any efficiency
gained from having a lighter more efficient engine/motor
is lost because the increase weight of the energy source.
By changing engine performance and lowering the
overall vehicle mass  a conventional diesel/gas cars to
get between 60 to 100 mpg - yes - they go a bit slower
( 0-60 mph in 15 seconds) they can not go as
fast maybe ( top out at 85 mph ) - but they get
60 to 100 mpg.  So where do they exist?  Well
you have to go to the Europe or Japan....

here are two examples that I know of.

2005-2009 Toyota Aygo (Japan/UK/Europe) - a conventional 4 door sedan
using a 3 cylinder diesel, about 65 mpg
   ( sister cars = Peugeot 107 and CitroŽn C1 )
   see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Aygo

2010 Axon hatchback (UK) - a 2 seater hatchback, carbon fiber chassis,
gasoline engine, claimed 100 mpg
   ( btw this vehicle is an entry into the Automotive X-Prize Contest
for best most practical commuter car)
   see http://www.axonautomotive.com/cars.html


Jeromy Clarkson of BBC's Top Gear ( a UK auto review TV show)
criticizes
electric vehicles, HeVs, and PHEV and because of the high cost and
low energy density  of batteries ( which means extra weight and lower
range)
He prefers using either a conventional diesel or gasoline engine to
power a
vehicle.

----------

This comes as a bit of surprise.  I would think the limited range of EV's
would not be much of a problem in the UK.  How often do Britains drive more
than a hundred km or so?  Or is the price of electric versus high mpg just
too much.

One of the EV's shortcomings in the US market is the longer distances that
Americans want in their vehicles.

daestrom


This Thread
Bookmark this thread:
 
 
 
 
 
 
  •  
  • Subject
  • Author
  • Date
please rate this thread