Hybrid Car ‚Äď More Fun with Less Gas

Has anyone seen a steam engine/electric battery hybrid vehicle? - Page 12

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Posted by Lord Gow333, Dirk Benedict's n on June 6, 2009, 4:25 am
 


I think Clarkson's argument was that hauling around all that extra weight in
the end burns up more energy than running a straight gas/diesel engine.
Motors have a different torque curve than engines so it's not that cut and
dry, but still something to ponder.


Not to mention the fact that half of us drive around in snow for half the
year.

A local talk show host, who drives a Hummer H2, cracked after the first
serious snowfall the one year "Hey, all you hybrid drivers... how's that
working out for you? Getting thru the snow okay with ALL THAT POWER?".

On a more serious note, a local car Q&A guy told of driving an electric car
to a nearby town (about 30 miles, fairly hilly). The trip there was nice,
sunny weather, car zipped right along. Then they headed back. It started
raining, wipers on. It got cold, heater on. It got dark, headlights on.
Batteries drained, car slowed, and they barely made it back.

Hybrid or even electric works fine in Cali or Florida. WNYers need petro
engines, and often four wheel drive.

LG
--
"Keep it simple. If it takes a genius to understand it, it will never work."
- Clarence Leonard "Kelly" Johnson


Posted by residualselfimage1999 on June 6, 2009, 10:51 am
 
On Jun 6, 12:25am, "Lord Gow333, Dirk Benedict's newest fan!"

When the temperatures drop below 32 degrees Fahrenheit,
I believe a conventional fuel injected gas/diesel vehicle could
be designed to be more FE than electric motors when
driving with no or very little traffic/congestion on
the highway). However, I believe even in the bitter cold,
in congested stop and go traffic conditions,  vehicles
based on electric motors with regenerative braking -
if given enough electric power -  would offer more FE
than a petrol based engine.

There are two thing major trends that make me favor
the hybrid solution (1)  the long term trend of rising
energy cost - especially that of petrol. (2) the long
term trend of increased traffic congestion in metropolitan
areas. The first trend suggest the need for future
higher vehicle fuel efficiency. The second trend
suggest a need for vehicles driving in metropolitan
areas to operated more efficiently in stop and go traffic
conditions.  This second trend probably is less of
a concern for someone who lives in western
New York. Drivers using the roads along
New York City, Boston, Baltimore-Washington-
Arlington corridor will find dealing with traffic
congestion more of a challenge than
snow (since metro areas have the funds and
the resources get the snow removed and the
roads salted fairly quickly).



Posted by Richard W. on June 6, 2009, 5:09 pm
 
On Jun 6, 12:25 am, "Lord Gow333, Dirk Benedict's newest fan!"

When the temperatures drop below 32 degrees Fahrenheit,
I believe a conventional fuel injected gas/diesel vehicle could
be designed to be more FE than electric motors when
driving with no or very little traffic/congestion on
the highway). However, I believe even in the bitter cold,
in congested stop and go traffic conditions,  vehicles
based on electric motors with regenerative braking -
if given enough electric power -  would offer more FE
than a petrol based engine.

There are two thing major trends that make me favor
the hybrid solution (1)  the long term trend of rising
energy cost - especially that of petrol. (2) the long
term trend of increased traffic congestion in metropolitan
areas. The first trend suggest the need for future
higher vehicle fuel efficiency. The second trend
suggest a need for vehicles driving in metropolitan
areas to operated more efficiently in stop and go traffic
conditions.  This second trend probably is less of
a concern for someone who lives in western
New York. Drivers using the roads along
New York City, Boston, Baltimore-Washington-
Arlington corridor will find dealing with traffic
congestion more of a challenge than
snow (since metro areas have the funds and
the resources get the snow removed and the
roads salted fairly quickly).

Actually those place that don't get much snow don't have the equimpment to
remove snow. Such as Portland, Salem, Vancouver WA. They can't justify the
expense of equimpment they might not need or need 1 to 2 weeks a year.

The problem with Hybrids is that diesels get more mileage in the same size
car for less money. My understanding is that hybrids are sold new at a loss
of around $0K each by the auto companys. Also the battery disposal hasn't
been figured in yet.

Richard W.



Posted by user on June 6, 2009, 5:57 pm
 Richard W. wrote:

Not in North America they don't. The 2010 Prius is a midsized car and
gets 50 mpg combined, 51 mpg in the city. The VW Jetta is rated at
combined 34mpg. Not even close.


  My understanding is that hybrids are sold new at a loss

Also the battery disposal hasn't

They are recycled, Toyota has a bounty on theirs






Posted by Richard W. on June 6, 2009, 7:20 pm
 

Rabbit had an EPA rating on the highway of 50 mpg in 1980 with a diesel.



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