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Home grown and processed diesel fuel

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Posted by Curbie on August 19, 2009, 5:45 pm
 


http://www.oilcrusher.5u.com/

This guy grows sunflower seeds and processes them to make his own fuel
for all his diesel tractors to run a large farm. He uses a screw press
to squeeze the oil from the seeds, mixes 10 to 15% regular gasoline to
a level set by a hydrometer to match the specific gravity of his home-
made fuel to that of #2 diesel fuel (not quite sure how specific
gravity equates to fuel volatility?) then runs it through a centrifuge
to mix and filter it. Once the fuel is mixed and filtered he claims it
does not settle or separate.

Id never heard of this notion before so I started digging through web-
site pages for scam flags (give me your money) and couldnt find any.
He appears to be saying this works for me, and heres how I do it. He
claims to have run 25,000 gallons of this home-made fuel through his
diesels without attributable problems.

I did some research on standard diesel fuel, found basically three
issues that diesel have to deal with in this area, volatility,
viscosity, and lubricity.

Volatility is needed to start "compression ignition" engines and to
prevent compression-chamber carbon-buildup causing a rise in
compression ratio and resulting in pre-ignition, knock, power-loss,
and engine damage if not properly cared for.

Viscosity (or lack thereof) is needed for fuel flow from the tank,
through filters, and then through the injectors. ("cloud", "pour",
"gel" or "wax" points)

Lubricity is the fuels ability to contribute its designed part to the
engines lubrication.

It seems like this ides has the potential to solve a lot if
transesterifed fuel issues?

Has anyone else heard of anyone using this idea, or can punch some
holes in it?

Thanks,

Curbie

Posted by Ulysses on August 20, 2009, 3:13 pm
 



http://www.oilcrusher.5u.com/

This guy grows sunflower seeds and processes them to make his own fuel
for all his diesel tractors to run a large farm. He uses a screw press
to squeeze the oil from the seeds, mixes 10 to 15% regular gasoline to
a level set by a hydrometer to match the specific gravity of his home-
made fuel to that of #2 diesel fuel (not quite sure how specific
gravity equates to fuel volatility?) then runs it through a centrifuge
to mix and filter it. Once the fuel is mixed and filtered he claims it
does not settle or separate.

I’d never heard of this notion before so I started digging through web-
site pages for scam flags (give me your money) and couldn’t find any.
He appears to be saying this works for me, and here’s how I do it. He
claims to have run 25,000 gallons of this home-made fuel through his
diesels without attributable problems.

I did some research on standard diesel fuel, found basically three
issues that diesel have to deal with in this area, volatility,
viscosity, and lubricity.

Volatility is needed to start "compression ignition" engines and to
prevent compression-chamber carbon-buildup causing a rise in
compression ratio and resulting in pre-ignition, knock, power-loss,
and engine damage if not properly cared for.

Viscosity (or lack thereof) is needed for fuel flow from the tank,
through filters, and then through the injectors. ("cloud", "pour",
"gel" or "wax" points)

Lubricity is the fuel’s ability to contribute its designed part to the
engine’s lubrication.

It seems like this ides has the potential to solve a lot if
transesterifed fuel issues?

Has anyone else heard of anyone using this idea, or can punch some
holes in it?

Thanks,

Curbie

The first thing that pops into my mind is "how much energy does it take to
make the fuel?"  I suppose it must be a net gain or nobody would bother
making their own bio-diesel.  Personally I think it would be a good idea to
have a diesel engine on hand and the ability to make the fuel just in
case...



Posted by user on August 20, 2009, 4:45 pm
 

Ulysses wrote:

I've often though this was the way to go for a small farmer, plant
enough oil crops to run the machinery. soyabeans give about 48 gallons
an acre, sunflowers about 102 gallons per acre, rape seed 127 gallons an
acre. So I guess it would work out to how much fuel it takes to plow ,
seed and harvest to figure out if it's worth it.

What I did find is that A 12-row-30 corn planter pulled by a 105-hp
tractor with mechanical front-wheel drive (MFWD) uses about 0.34 gallons
of diesel fuel per acre.

Posted by Curbie on August 21, 2009, 7:18 am
 

Ulysses.


From my understanding by corresponding with two fairly large users of
this SVO-Gas system the process is normal agriculture, followed by
pressing the oil from the seeds, mixing the oil with gasoline, and
filtering the mixture through a centrifuge (diesel truck oil filter).
I thinks there may be a difference in economy of scale for both yields
and fuel usage between farm and home scales operations.

But still, even if the yields were 50% of farm-scale or 50 gallon per
acre for 2 acres and fuel usage was 10x of farm-scale or 5 gallon of
fuel per acre, that still leaves 100 gallons for the cost of 10
gallons of gasoline and no federal alcohol permits to produce home-
scale ethanol.

With the diesel's more efficient use of fuel, it would seem that it
could equate to 200 hours NET engine use per year.

Curbie

Posted by harry on August 22, 2009, 6:32 pm
 


Part of the reason for getting a higher MPG with diesel is that diesel
has a higher calorific value. (ie has more energy per unit wieght)  As
it's denser than petrol you get more wieght of fuel as you buy it by
volume.

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