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Posted by amdx on June 2, 2014, 9:50 pm
 
  I ran across this blog written by a physicist, he uses math but  
nothing difficult.

   This particular blog is about him installing a door blower to  
pressurize his home and quantify air leaks.

http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/2013/03/lets-blow-this-joint/#more-1365  

This is the homepage, you will find his other energy articles interesting.

http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-math/  

                                 Mikek


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Posted by adsDUMP on June 4, 2014, 12:40 am
 


He's way ahead of me, but you don't always need technology to improve
efficiency.

I did the initial sealing of our now 40 year old house shortly after
we purchased it 10 years ago, primarily by eye.  The biggest leaks
were visible - no weatherstrip between the double doors leading to the
screened porch (probably equivalent to a brick-sized hole in the
wall), no storm windows or multi-pane windows, no recent caulk around
windows and doors (especially bad around the bay window in the eat-in
area of the kitchen), etc.

I spent about $00 on caulk, weatherstripping, and storm windows
(faster to install those than to replace existing windows - and it's
cold in January).  The changes made a $0 difference in the heating
bill from one month to the next - gotta love things that give a quick
pay-back ;-)

We're still working on replacing windows, but have replaced the double
doors and a single door with insulated doors with double-pane glass
windows, and added insulation in the attic - the original blown-in
ranged from 6 inches to a light dusting.

Things are much better than they were.  When the controller of the
high-efficiency, high-tech furnace we had installed a couple of years
ago died in January of this year (we were having some single digit
lows then) we heated most of the main level with a 23,000 BTU kerosene
heater for the two weeks it took them to get a "five day turn-around"
part.  

I did get the 10 year parts and service warranty with the new furnace.
Considering the number of calls we've had the repair guys out on for
problems, that was a very good investment.  Having been a beta tester
for versions of the Unix operating system (among other things), I
never trust version 0 of anything.


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