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Posted by Michael B on November 27, 2010, 2:34 am
 

Are you aware of the Etek motor from Briggs & Stratton?

Posted by Jim Rojas on November 27, 2010, 2:53 am
 
Michael B wrote:

Yes. It is basically an alternator converted into a motor using
permanent magnets. You can do this yourself for a fraction of the cost.

I like to use the AC Delco AD244 alternator, because the electronics can
be accessed without taking the rotor out for servicing.

You must remove the rotor coil and brushes. Replace them with as many 3
inch neomags as you can fit in there. My guess would be 2 or 3 one inch
thick. This will create 400+ lbs of pulling force. You can use cylinder
neomags, by inserting them one at a time and stacking them in the same
fashion.

If you leave it as is, it now becomes a low cut in RPM very high output
alternator. You should get 2-3 times the overall rated amps at idle
speed (800-1000RPM).

If you wish to convert it into a motor, you must remove the diode packs
and voltage regulator. Connect the 3 phase outputs to an 5+HP rated AC
drive. This now becomes equivalent to a 5-10HP motor.

Jim Rojas


Posted by Jim Rojas on November 27, 2010, 2:55 am
 Michael B wrote:

Yes. It is basically an alternator converted into a motor using
permanent magnets. You can do this yourself for a fraction of the cost.

I like to use the AC Delco AD244 alternator, because the electronics can
be accessed without taking the rotor out for servicing.

You must remove the rotor coil and brushes. Replace them with as many 3
inch neomags as you can fit in there. My guess would be 2 or 3 one inch
thick. This will create 400+ lbs of pulling force. You can use cylinder
neomags, by inserting them one at a time and stacking them in the same
fashion.

If you leave it as is, it now becomes a low cut in RPM very high output
alternator. You should get 2-3 times the overall rated amps at idle
speed (800-1000RPM).

If you wish to convert it into a motor, you must remove the diode packs
and voltage regulator. Connect the 3 phase outputs to an 5+HP rated AC
drive. This now becomes equivalent to a 5-10HP motor.

Jim Rojas


Posted by Jim Rojas on November 27, 2010, 2:58 am
 Michael B wrote:

Yes. It is basically an alternator converted into a motor using
permanent magnets. You can do this yourself for a fraction of the cost.

I like to use the AC Delco AD244 alternator, because the electronics can
be accessed without taking the rotor out for servicing.

You must remove the rotor coil and brushes. Replace them with as many 3
inch neomags as you can fit in there. My guess would be 2 or 3 one inch
thick. This will create 400+ lbs of pulling force. You can use cylinder
neomags, by inserting them one at a time and stacking them in the same
fashion.

If you leave it as is, it now becomes a low cut in RPM very high output
alternator. You should get 2-3 times the overall rated amps at idle
speed (800-1000RPM).

If you wish to convert it into a motor, you must remove the diode packs
and voltage regulator. Connect the 3 phase outputs to an 5+HP rated AC
drive. This now becomes equivalent to a 5-10HP motor.

Jim Rojas


--
Jim Rojas
Technical Manuals Online!
http://www.tech-man.com
8002 Cornwall Lane
Tampa, FL 33615-4604
813-884-6335

Posted by Michael B on November 27, 2010, 4:05 am
 

The Etek was an excellent motor with a wide range of applications,
but they simply stopped making it after about three years. No damn
wonder this is becoming a third-world country.

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