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Reflective Attic Liner

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Posted by W on February 9, 2011, 6:26 am
 
There is an outfit in the San Francisco Bay Area named Eagleshield that
pushes the use of a reflective liner on the inside of the roof, to reflect
away solar heat during summer.   Is anyone familiar with this kind of
product and how well does it work?

Are there strong differences in the quality of the material used for such
reflective insulation, and what are the scales or criteria used to specify
the highest efficacy material.     I would be tempted to have a third party
do the install but want to make sure I don't compromise on the material.

--
W



Posted by W on February 10, 2011, 2:40 am
 

significantly,

reflector.

Would installing a ridge vent at the top of the roof address that concern?

I guess with a ridge vent you would accelerate cooling of the attic, and
without sufficient insulation you would accelerate cooling of the home as
well?

--
W



Posted by Michael B on February 11, 2011, 4:11 pm
 I am just not impressed with a plastic product that is
going to be installed at the hottest part of the house.
Unless there is a nonprorated guarantee of at least
20 years, for a company that will still be around to
honor it.
And able to be installed without special instructions,
and the payback period...well, you get the idea.
I'm simply not impressed.
A ridge vent, with suitable soffit venting is IMO the way
to go.
And a reminder. If you don't have a minimum of one
square foot of vent per 300 feet of vented space, you
likely have no guarantee on your shingles. And for the
sake of comfort, it should be per 150 feet or better.
regardless of what else you put in your attic, the paperwork
for the shingles calls for VENTING. Any questions, I suggest
calling the Owens-Corning folks at 1-800-ROOFING



Posted by W on February 11, 2011, 10:40 pm
 Will a ridge vent have the downside of tending to make the attic colder
during the Winter?

It seems like you would want to have a system where the vents open during
heat but shut during lower temperatures.

--
W


I am just not impressed with a plastic product that is
going to be installed at the hottest part of the house.
Unless there is a nonprorated guarantee of at least
20 years, for a company that will still be around to
honor it.
And able to be installed without special instructions,
and the payback period...well, you get the idea.
I'm simply not impressed.
A ridge vent, with suitable soffit venting is IMO the way
to go.
And a reminder. If you don't have a minimum of one
square foot of vent per 300 feet of vented space, you
likely have no guarantee on your shingles. And for the
sake of comfort, it should be per 150 feet or better.
regardless of what else you put in your attic, the paperwork
for the shingles calls for VENTING. Any questions, I suggest
calling the Owens-Corning folks at 1-800-ROOFING



Posted by Pete C. on February 12, 2011, 12:28 am
 
W wrote:

The attic is supposed to be cold in the winter, warm attics cause ice
dams.

Attics are not conditioned spaces, the floor of the attic is where the
insulation is supposed to be to keep the heat in the house in the winter
and out of the house in the summer. The attic is supposed to be a well
ventilated buffer space.

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