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Posted by Giga2 on July 20, 2011, 6:33 am
 


And *we* (not including you) came to the conclusion it was economical.


What is it now?



Posted by Dawlish on July 20, 2011, 8:21 am
 
On Jul 20, 7:33am, "Giga2" <"Giga2" <just(removetheseandaddmatthe
end)ho...@yahoo.co> wrote:

And what if the cost of electricity rises, which it will, producing an
increasing return over time for the electricity the installation is
producing? It is that which is a major financial attraction for me (as
well as the excellent and pretty undeniable positive environmental
credentials of these schemes) and that should offset any future
breaking-of-promises clawback of subsidy from the Government (which
will happen; I am not in the slightest bit naive about that) and make
these systems profitable without subsidy. Maintenence costs are a
possible downside, so I intend to wait and watch for a year or so and
keep on talking to the person down the street who's had it installed.

Does frankie actually think electricity prices are not going to rise
over the lifetime of this installation that John has fitted?

Posted by John Gilmer on July 24, 2011, 4:51 pm
 

The "environmental" types may not want to heat this, but in a situation
like a solar array, when it doesn't make "economic sense" the odds are
once you do the cost and environmental accounting it will not make
environmental sense either.

In the short term, "private solar" is best for those who often  (because
of storms and such) end up "off grid" whether they like it or not.

In hot climates, the power load tends to peak in response to the solar
load.   Thus, solar power would seem to be a nature supplement.   The
only negative is that the heat effects on power requirements is delayed
a few hours.   Thus, there isn't any solar to offset early evening power
demands.

If governments want to force these issues, the subsidies (or direct
orders) should be directed toward the power company construction and use
of large solar arrays.


Posted by vaughn on July 24, 2011, 5:18 pm
 

In the case of PV, that old chestnut was disproved years ago, at least as far as
energy accounting goes.  A complete and unbiased birth-to-grave comparative
environmental accounting of private PV vs. utility-produced power is virtually
impossible. . I would be suspicious of any such "accountings" you might find.


Actually, grid tie PV systems typically disconnect and turn themselves off if
the grid is not available.  If you add batteries to a PV system to make it
independent of the grid, you totally change the economics, plus the
environmental advantage (if any) of the system is certainly diminished



As a guy who lives in South Florida, I wholeheartedly agree.  But the best
answer here might not be PV at all.  It might be solar powered absorption-type
air conditioning.  Don't see any on the market though..

Vaughn



Posted by Mho on July 24, 2011, 6:19 pm
 Care to elaborate on that method more? I would like to know more about that
one. Cites?

Does it fit in all climates or just the drier Ca. climate?

------------

As a guy who lives in South Florida, I wholeheartedly agree.  But the best
answer here might not be PV at all.  It might be solar powered
absorption-type
air conditioning.  Don't see any on the market though..

Vaughn



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