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Posted by amdx on June 24, 2010, 10:40 pm
 




--
MikeK

  Way cool man!
 We actually have a walk in, 9' x 6' x 6' we ran it for a short time as
needed.
But haven't used it for 5 or 6 years, it seems to be good as a storage
locker at
this point. I plug it in occasionally just as maintenance.
My wife's gut feeling is that it uses a lot of electricity. She is quite
aware of where
the pennies go, so I didn't argue.
  I like to have real numbers, thanks for the study you made.
 As far as cool down, when we get shrimp to load in the freezers it is
already frozen.
 If it wasn't, it would probably go bad before it froze! We usually put
about 600 lbs
in one freezer.
         Mike



Posted by whit3rd on June 25, 2010, 9:12 am
 



Not fair.  The walk-in takes 64 sq feet of floor area, the
twelve chests take over twice that.  What's the cost of
a building nowadays, $0 per square foot?

Again, unfair.   Choose the right size of walk-in and redo that
argument.


This sounds odd to me; firstly, a freezer indoors costs you twice,
once
in freezer electricity and (in summer) again in airconditioning cost.
Secondly, walk-in freezers ought to have the same efficiency as
a chest freezer, and should need less cooling because they have
similar insulation but lower external surface area.


Your 'spare' for the walk-in is gonna be a phone call to get
a refrigerated container delivered.  Any trucking company can
do this for you.  I'm dubious that you plan to lose all of
the contents of a chest if/when one fails, either.   And with
twelve chest freezers, they're gonna fail twelve times as
often.   Either way, your contingency plans should cover faults.

Posted by amdx on June 25, 2010, 12:06 pm
 



--
MikeK

 It is cubic feet, not floor area that counts. The walkin is at least
2 times the height of the feezers.



argument.

Refer to previous answer, a larger walkin will cost even more.



This sounds odd to me; firstly, a freezer indoors costs you twice,

.in freezer electricity and (in summer) again in airconditioning cost.

My freezers are outdoors in a screened porch.
I agree on your lower external surface area, same efficiency
staement.


 I never said I would lose all the contents of a chest freezer.
That's why my alarms are set at -5F, so I get an early warning.
 And we always keep an empty one.

 >And with

Maybe, but chest freezers seem to have long lives, 10 to 20 years.



Posted by vaughn on June 25, 2010, 4:42 pm
 



Actually, the situation is not nearly so simple.  In terms of the BTU's of heat
that are pumped out of the freezer into the room, they are the *very same* heat
BTUs that leaked from the room into the freezer.  So that turns out to be a
wash.  Further, the freezers would operate a bit more efficiently in the cooled
space because 1) There would be less delta-T across the insulation, so less heat
loss + less compressor operation,   and 2) the condenser would operate a bit
more efficiently in the cooled room because it would see a larger delta-T.  On
the other side of the equation, all of the waste heat (I squared R loss + core
loss) from the compressor motors and (if any) fan motors would appear as heat
load to the AC.

Vaughn





Posted by GregS on June 25, 2010, 7:19 pm
 


With surround coils imbedded under the sheetmetal, the differential
is more constant. How thick the insulation is more important.

greg

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