Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

Your electric car of the future. - Page 25

register ::  Login Password  :: Lost Password?
Posted by Eeyore on June 8, 2008, 11:19 pm
 


Anthony Matonak wrote:


Is this a joke are are you also intellectually dysfunctional ?

Enquiring minds need to know whether you belong on a black-list.

Graham


Posted by Neon John on June 9, 2008, 3:21 am
 
On Sun, 08 Jun 2008 15:28:04 -0700, Anthony Matonak


Strangely enough, Anthony, agreement has already been reached on charging
connectors.  There is the GM Magnecharge inductive interface that has lost
popularity because of its cost, complexity and relative fragility.  Then there
is the conductive connector (brand name slips my mind at the moment, AVR?).
This is a smart connector over which the charger and car exchange data before
and during the charge cycle.

There is actually a defacto third standard outlet for cars with on-board
chargers and that is the common ordinary 50 amp range outlet.  The same outlet
that is used for 50 amp hookups in RV parks.

This thread has my curiosity aroused.  I wonder if there is anyone in this
thread other than me who actually owns an EV?

John
--
John De Armond
See my website for my current email address
http://www.neon-john.com
http://www.johndearmond.com  <-- best little blog on the net!
Tellico Plains, Occupied TN
There is room for all of God's creatures.... Right next to the mashed potatoes.


Posted by Anthony Matonak on June 9, 2008, 4:59 am
 Neon John wrote:
...

I have wanted to buy an electric car (*) for the past 20 years but
they haven't been available for sale. If no one makes them then I
can't buy one.

Anthony
--
* Golf carts are not electric cars. Cars must be able to drive the
freeways, seat at least two people and go more than 75 miles.

Posted by Neon John on June 9, 2008, 7:10 am
 On Sun, 08 Jun 2008 21:59:44 -0700, Anthony Matonak


Doesn't seem like you've wanted to buy one very much or you'd own one now. You
could have bought a Chrysler TEvan or a Toyota RAV4 when they were offered for
sale.  Or you could have leased an EV1.  You can still buy RAV4s used. One
just went on Ebay last week - for about $0,000.  TEvans also come up for sale
fairly often.  To refresh your memory, these are full size vans that Chrysler
built from the ground up as electrics.

Or you could have, then as now, gone to a professional converter and had the
car of your choice converted to electric with the same quality as the major
OEMs.  Here's one whose work I'm familiar with

http://www.evdrive.com/index.html

Or you can buy one already converted.


No they don't.  That's simply your personal spec.  My electric car needs to
seat one person, go 60 miles and keep up with surface street traffic.  My
"golf cart", as you call it, (which is a fully licensed vehicle and not an
NEV) does that quite nicely.  99.99% of my driving is done in my local area.
Truth be known, over half of those trips are done on my hotrod electric
scooter.  About once a month I hit the interstate to buy groceries and
supplies and for that my gas car does just fine and the cost is tolerable.

In return for not requiring my EV to be a do-everything Swiss army knife, I
was able to get it up and running for under $,000.  It saved me more than
that in gasoline, probably in the first year, even before the price rise of
the last little while.

The vehicle that I'm working on now will go a little farther and a little
faster but will be just as inexpensive to build and operate.

If you failed to get the technical education and experience necessary to build
yourself an EV then you'll get to pay someone else to do it.  If you have
unrealistic expectations of what your EV must do then you'll pay even more.
These silly range expectations writ large are what is driving the price of the
GM Volt into the stratosphere.

Errand running and other local commuting is where an EV excels - as the second
family vehicle, backing up the conventional cars.  That way conventional cars
get used only when necessary - for long trips, towing things, carrying heavy
loads and many people.  That second car isn't very practical if it costs as
much as the primary vehicle.  That's what your silly range and speed
expectations are producing.  A $0,000 run-about isn't really practical, after
all.

There is a sweet spot in the range and speed vs cost map right now that
occupies a range of 50 to 80 miles and a speed of 60-65 mph.  That spot is set
primarily by battery technology.  It's moving upward but very slowly.
Meanwhile, most trips that most people make can be satisfied with existing
vehicle capabilities.

So anyway, I do have to ask.  Why are you posting here like you actually know
something about EVs when you have no experience at all?

John
--
John De Armond
See my website for my current email address
http://www.neon-john.com
http://www.johndearmond.com  <-- best little blog on the net!
Tellico Plains, Occupied TN
There is room for all of God's creatures.... Right next to the mashed potatoes.


Posted by Leonard Abbott on June 9, 2008, 10:02 am
 John what is your opinion about adding electric power to the rear wheels
of a standard 4 cylinder?

You could use the extra power to accelerate. or use it to assist the
engine, for better mileage.
lenny


This Thread
Bookmark this thread:
 
 
 
 
 
 
  •  
  • Subject
  • Author
  • Date
| ---> Re: Your electric car of the future. clare at snyder dot ontario do06-13-2008
please rate this thread