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anyone play with the Honeywell inverter generators? - Page 5

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Posted by nate on June 19, 2010, 12:51 pm
 


I don't know about honeywell as I have a honda inverter generator.

Can someone tell me what does "Floating Neutral" mean on this honeywell page

http://www.honeywellgenerators.com/products/hw7000eh_566992039

On my honda, I see no such reference and assume it has nothing to do with the
requirement that I always connect a neutral wire from honda body post to a
copper spike driven into ground before running generator.

If way off, please educate.



Posted by Josepi on June 19, 2010, 12:59 pm
 


"Floating neutral" means the neutral of the generator is not connected to
the case or ground pin of the recepticals.

This is necessary for tying into some grid electrical systems. The theory is
that if the ground conductor carries some of the current (It always does
with two grounded neutral points) you could have some induction into the
larger grid system between the neutral and the ground and "kill a
linesperson" by backfeeding the system.

All conductors, including neutral conductor switching is needed on a
transfer switch if the neutral is connected to the ground on the generator.
Simple two breakers with an interlock is not good enough. Keeping the ground
isolated and dependant on the main panel ground (only)  allows this simpler
switching configuration.



I don't know about honeywell as I have a honda inverter generator.

Can someone tell me what does "Floating Neutral" mean on this honeywell page

http://www.honeywellgenerators.com/products/hw7000eh_566992039

On my honda, I see no such reference and assume it has nothing to do with
the
requirement that I always connect a neutral wire from honda body post to a
copper spike driven into ground before running generator.

If way off, please educate.




Posted by m II on June 19, 2010, 3:42 pm
 

Josepi wrote:



Induction into a larger grid system? Where do you get this stuff? The
above paragraph looks like a word salad made up of random selections
picked up from who knows where....





mike

Posted by hubops on June 19, 2010, 7:40 pm
 




================================================
Question
I have heard there are different kinds of transfer devices that are
required to be used with different kinds of residential standby
generators, something to do with switching the neutral connection, can
you explain?

Answer
Yes. The requirement for switching the neutral in the transfer device
is dependant on the type of standby generator you have for your
residence.
If the generator neutral is bonded to the generator frame then the
Code requires the neutral to be switched in the transfer device.
If the generator neutral is not bonded to the generator frame (it is
"floating"), then the Code requires that it be solidly connected in
the transfer device (it is not switched).
CSA Standard C22.2 No 100 Motors & generators, requires that the
status of the generator neutral conductor be marked on each generator
as follows: "Neutral Floating" or "Neutral Bonded To Frame".
Several of the newer generator transfer panels have the ability to be
configured either way.
Rule 10-204.
Ontario Electrical Safety Code 24th Edition/2009
ESA encourages the use of Licensed Electrical Contractors.
All electrical work requires a Certificate of Inspection from the
Electrical Safety Authority.
================================================


Posted by Josepi on June 19, 2010, 8:33 pm
 

I believe the US NEC may have a different rule regarding switching the
neutral. A few years back Home Depot Canada had quite a few transfer
switches without neutral switching available. When asked about them, the
sales guy stated they were supposed to hide them as they had to go back and
were not to be sold in Canada.

From that I have to assume (like many other NEC rules in the USA) some code
rules are a little looser in the US. Most of their cheap electrical boxes
are not usable in Canada. Too bad the price is right.

YMMV


Question
I have heard there are different kinds of transfer devices that are
required to be used with different kinds of residential standby
generators, something to do with switching the neutral connection, can
you explain?

Answer
Yes. The requirement for switching the neutral in the transfer device
is dependant on the type of standby generator you have for your
residence.
If the generator neutral is bonded to the generator frame then the
Code requires the neutral to be switched in the transfer device.
If the generator neutral is not bonded to the generator frame (it is
"floating"), then the Code requires that it be solidly connected in
the transfer device (it is not switched).
CSA Standard C22.2 No 100 Motors & generators, requires that the
status of the generator neutral conductor be marked on each generator
as follows: "Neutral Floating" or "Neutral Bonded To Frame".
Several of the newer generator transfer panels have the ability to be
configured either way.
Rule 10-204.
Ontario Electrical Safety Code 24th Edition/2009
ESA encourages the use of Licensed Electrical Contractors.
All electrical work requires a Certificate of Inspection from the
Electrical Safety Authority.
================================================



================================================



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