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anyone play with the Honeywell inverter generators? - Page 6

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Posted by Jim Wilkins on June 19, 2010, 9:51 pm
 



From a dim memory of back when I was supposed to know that stuff, the
difference is whether or not the code assumes that hot and neutral
might be swapped.

jsw

Posted by Josepi on June 19, 2010, 10:58 pm
 


Interesting. Can you explain further?

I was informed (where I can't remeber..or thought) the concept In Canada was
that the neutral could be livened to ground (an it always is with load) and
it could backfeed the grid and be transformed up to higher voltages.

Now that would take a few other wiring problems to happen. The neutral on
the street transformer would have to have a bad ground connection (quite
common), some leakage would have to incurred from hot to ground (quite
possible too) and maybe a few other factors...LOL

While I believe the chances of this backfeed actually becoming a problem is
so remote, it is not my rules. Switching a neutral makes much more costs. My
co-gen input doesn't bother but I have an isolated neutral in it anyway. The
Inspector was more concerned that I paid my fees than actually looking at
it.

Two initial  inspectors, basically ran away from the project, saying "Wait
until the regular guy gets back"...LOL

The last Inspector studied my flow diagram for a few seconds and said it
would be fine and then ran for his vehicle to check payment...LOL



news:ae3ee352-cf3e-43c6-80a4-
From a dim memory of back when I was supposed to know that stuff, the
difference is whether or not the code assumes that hot and neutral
might be swapped.

jsw


5eca2865f296@s9g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...


Posted by Ralph Mowery on June 19, 2010, 11:30 pm
 



I think the inspectors are really just to make sure they can tax you on
improvements.  They do catch some building errors and do help to keep the
builders somewhat honest.

I think some of the discussion is about Canada wiring also.
I don't know anything about Canada and their electrical system in the homes.
Is it the same as in the US as far as sending 240 volts into the house the a
neutral to get 120 volts ?
I am thinking England only uses 240 volts and no neuteral and no 120 volt
sockets in the house.



Posted by Josepi on June 20, 2010, 1:49 am
 

For Canada:
Yes we run the same systems, mostly, as the USA. 120/240v, 120/208v. I am
sure the USA runs a network voltage, perhaps area sensitive though, in large
apartment buildings 125/216V. Each apartment gets two legs of the three
phase....saves some copper. A little high on the 120 and a little low on the
240v but works fine. Freaks all the electricians out, though.

Area dependant, we have 600 volt delta, fading out into 360/600v wye/star 4
wire, whereas the USA and our western provinces have 440V delta for
commercial and industrial apps.

I always thought England / EU ran ungrounded 240v systems in houses. I have
heard online reports that there are grounded centre (US = center) taps on
the transformers, lately??  Some of our European techs talked about lighting
jumping the transformers and long sparks flying out of recepticals, when
they were kids, over 'ohm. (US = home)

I believe the US is behind on upgrading to metric electrical services yet.
Have you heard anything about this coming, in the near future?


LOL
I think the inspectors are really just to make sure they can tax you on
improvements.  They do catch some building errors and do help to keep the
builders somewhat honest.

I think some of the discussion is about Canada wiring also.
I don't know anything about Canada and their electrical system in the homes.
Is it the same as in the US as far as sending 240 volts into the house the a
neutral to get 120 volts ?
I am thinking England only uses 240 volts and no neuteral and no 120 volt
sockets in the house.






Posted by RamRod Sword of Baal on June 20, 2010, 2:47 am
 





England does use neutrals.

The active used to be red (Brown now?) and the neutral black (Blue now?) and
the earth green (yellow and green now?)

England does not have 120 volts as a standard voltage.

The English system is 3 phase and single phase. Now it was 415 volts for 3
phase and 240 volts for single phase but I think that has been reduced to
230 volts to comply with European standards, not sure how much the 3 phase
voltage has been reduced.

In UK they have a ring main that is used for domestic plugs (13 amp) where
the cable starts at the 30 amp fuse and returns to the same fuse allowing
the current to flow both ways through the cable. The actual appliance plug
has a smaller fuse inside of it to protect the appliance.



 


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