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Posted by vaughn on July 16, 2009, 2:37 pm
 


There are two things that can happen to small generators if not occasionally
"exercised".

1) The generator can lose its residual magnetism.  If this happens, it will
run but fail to produce power.  There are various ways to "flash" the
generator field to remagnetize the generator.

2) Engines, particularly carbureted gasoline engines, can gum up, or parts
can rust up if they are allowed to sit for a long time.

Read your generator's manual.  There are probably storage instructions.
Follow them!

Vaughn



Posted by The Daring Dufas on July 16, 2009, 7:04 pm
 
Brian wrote:

few places' that small

means run with a load on

frequently ???

All the stationary backup generators I've installed were
setup to crank and run for 15 minutes once a week. The
newer Generac models run at half speed during test mode
in order to make less noise. The weekly test keeps the
generator ready for use at a moments notice. The homeowner
can do a load test, if they desire, by turning off the
main feed to the circuits covered by the genset. As for
small portable generators, you always use fuel stabilizer/
treatment if it's a gasoline or diesel powered. One good
reason for a monthly test is it will cook or blow out any
critters that decide to take up residence. A monthly test
will also keep the corrosion down by splashing oil around
the crankcase and boiling away any water that may have
condensed on internal and external surfaces. Getting the
generator portion warm will also drive out any moisture
that may have collected. You could use an electric heater
for a load since it would mimic the load bank that a genset
service company would use.

TDD

Posted by Bruce in alaska on July 19, 2009, 6:18 am
 

Well, I, for one, agree with this "You" fellow, in that Stabilizer isn't
needed in Diesel Fuel, for the operation of Diesel Engines.  I have 40+
years of operating, maintaining, and generating ALL my own power, out
here in the bush of Alaska, mostly with diesel fueled Gensets.  I have
burned diesel fuel that was left over for WWII, and was over 40 years
old at the time of use. It was in sealed 55USG Drums, found in an old
Military Bunker. Burned just fine, with no difference in generating
capacity noted during the run. If you have clean diesel going in to your
tank, and keep the water out of the tank, diesel will store basically
"Forever".  I have a 250KUSG TankFarm, that we fill every fall, and the
diesel is just as good in the spring, as it was, when it was pumped in
the previous Fall. Some of the fuel in those tanks may be 2 or 3 years
old, before it gets used. Never had a problem in 40 years, except ONCE,
when we got a Barge Load, with bugs in the fuel. We had to biocide three
tanks, and so did every other customer that got a delivery from that
Barge, that trip.  All paid for, by the distributer, and a BIG Apology,
for delivering Bad Fuel. We don't get the GasOhol Crap that the Feds
force on you Flatlanders, as the barge can only carry one Grade of
Gasoline, and it needs to be FAA Certified for 80/86 Low Lead AVGAS,
so we don't have to deal with most of the Gasoline problems you guys do.
Our #1 Diesel is JetA50, as well, so we always get the "Good Stuff" from
the Distributer, rather than the slop they pump to the Consumer Sales
places.

--
Bruce in alaska
add <path> after <fast> to reply

Posted by The Daring Dufas on July 19, 2009, 7:03 am
 Bruce in alaska wrote:

I also agree that diesel doesn't need stabilizer like the gasoline
that it's meant for. The information I have indicates that newer
diesel blends aren't as good as the older blends because of government
mandated emission standards. Hell, you guys in Alaska know more about
diesel generators and small airplanes than any other Americans for
obvious reasons. It wouldn't surprise me if you didn't get fuel from
Russia from some folks who also know what works in the God awful cold.
I would imagine that the 40 year old diesel fuel you found was not
kept in a warm environment. I think the problems I faced with diesel
fuel in a tropical climate may not plague you in your somewhat less
tropical climate in Alaska. We had extreme humidity and condensation
to deal with and tried to keep things warm to drive moisture out of
equipment. Bugs love the tropics. By the way, correct me if I'm wrong
but isn't jet fuel blended with additives to prevent gelling or microbe
infestation since jet fuel is often exposed to environmental extremes?

TDD

Posted by Stormin Mormon on July 19, 2009, 3:25 pm
 Many years ago, sometime in the eighties. I met a fellow who
told me he ran out of gas one night, along the road. A
trucker stopped by to help. they drained a couple galons of
diesel out of the truck tank, and poured into the car. The
car ran very poorly, but did run.

Like you say, wouldn't totally surprise me if Alaskans
bought fuel from Russia. More likely, Russians come over to
buy fuel. Since supply problems used to be epidemic in
Mother Russia. Like how medical care is a problem in Canada,
and they come to Michigan.

Wasn't there something about jet fuel, they wanted to add a
jelly something so that if a plane crashed, the fuel didn't
atomize and make an explosive mist?

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  www.lds.org
.



I also agree that diesel doesn't need stabilizer like the
gasoline
that it's meant for. The information I have indicates that
newer
diesel blends aren't as good as the older blends because of
government
mandated emission standards. Hell, you guys in Alaska know
more about
diesel generators and small airplanes than any other
Americans for
obvious reasons. It wouldn't surprise me if you didn't get
fuel from
Russia from some folks who also know what works in the God
awful cold.
I would imagine that the 40 year old diesel fuel you found
was not
kept in a warm environment. I think the problems I faced
with diesel
fuel in a tropical climate may not plague you in your
somewhat less
tropical climate in Alaska. We had extreme humidity and
condensation
to deal with and tried to keep things warm to drive moisture
out of
equipment. Bugs love the tropics. By the way, correct me if
I'm wrong
but isn't jet fuel blended with additives to prevent gelling
or microbe
infestation since jet fuel is often exposed to environmental
extremes?

TDD



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