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Posted by Jim Wilkins on November 28, 2010, 12:39 am
 

Enthalpy (moisture transfer) heat exchangers:
http://cipco.apogee.net/ces/library/tdew.asp

jsw

Posted by Josepi on November 28, 2010, 2:46 am
 
Seems like a good way to go but the bathrooms are vented through this system
also and I would be afriad of the stink being transfered.

Anybody know if this is the case? I know the recirculating ones it would
happen. That was an option I let go...and the prices were higher yet.


Enthalpy (moisture transfer) heat exchangers:
http://cipco.apogee.net/ces/library/tdew.asp

jsw



Posted by Josepi on November 27, 2010, 8:41 pm
 To understand your switching logic, this means you have the thermostat temp
contact and a close on high humidistat contact in series?

...and you are finding this works more human comfortable and energy
economical than just a temp. alone?

Would you set the temp. at the minimum and let the humidtstat run the show,
mostly then?

In Ontario the common item pushed is the HRV (heat recovery ventilator) for
humidity and vapour / fume control. It centrally replaces the bathroom
exhaust fan and attempts to save heat by "swapping" some of the hot air heat
for cool intake air. WE have vapour barriered out homes so tightly that we
can die from CO2 buildup from cooking and other household products,,,like
paint, formaldehyde (sp?) in manufactured goods etc....

Whie this works well there are some caveats.

In the winter, it dries your house right out and a humidifier is needed. I
got one last winter at 23% humidity...nose bleeds and sore throat get
common.
In the summer the exhausted air is replaced by high humidity / hot intake
air and is hard on the A/C energy consumption.

After attempting run on humidistat alone for a few years I have discovered
another input contact on the HRV unit. One to three contact pulses give
20,40 and 60 minutes of running the HRV and this works well in the smelly /
humid rooms in all the bathrooms, laundry and skylight windows. My hugely
expensive thermostats have some cicle control that I have tied into the HRV
and can guarantee 10-100% of each heat cycle per thermostat setback daily
quadrant. We find if the HRV doesn't tun at least 10%-20% of the time we
just don't feel alert and feel headachey...we think, so far.

More logic is required yet, when I get more time to automate this home I
have built.





I took an April-Aire humidity sensor, wired it backwards to
"make" on humidity rise instead of fall, and inserted it into
the red wire of the thermostat for my A/C. So that the A/C
serves as a whole-house dehumidifier rather than trying to
compete with that big fusion reactor about 8 light-minutes
away.

After all, a muggy 73 degrees can be far less comfortable
than a drier 83 degrees.  So the thermostat is set for 73,
and we adjust the humidistat for comfort, usually at about
35%, it gets reset at higher temperature.

And after a shower, it kicks on about 45 seconds after we
open the bathroom door, runs till the humidity has been
brought down near it, and we never have a mold or
mildew issue in the bathroom.

If I come in from cutting grass and I would like it to be
running for a while, I just breathe a nice wet breath
to the humidistat, and it kicks on for a few minutes.
It has made a difference in my utility bill, and my wife does
not wake up with a dry throat in the morning.



Posted by vaughn on November 26, 2010, 11:26 pm
 

Also in Florida, we installed a mini-split reverse cycle AC in our bedroom.
Winter or summer, that is the only nighttime AC or heat running in our house. It
is more efficient than our (older) central unit, and so quiet it's hard to tell
when it's running. If we weren't empty nesting, I would do the same with the
other bedrooms. In the daytime, the bedroom doors are closed and the central AC
vents to them are closed off.  There is no need to heat or cool empty rooms.

Vaughn



Posted by z on November 27, 2010, 8:01 am
 

I like to sleep in the cold too.  But I use the 50 degree rule. Above 50 I
don't make a fire.. below I make one at least when I'm working.  Fingers
get cold typing on the computer ;)

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