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options for crawl space energy store

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Posted by andyv on November 2, 2010, 3:50 pm
 
My house is made of brick and sits on a concrete foundation. which
covers the whole of the underfloor area so there is no bare earth
under there. There is a crawl space which is between 2 to 3 feet high
under the main part of the house.

I want to improve heat retention in the house but am undecided on how
to do this. The easiest option I think is to fit foam insulation in
between the floor joists, but I wonder if the crawl space can be
turned ito a heat sink of sorts.

I just don't know how to go about deciding on this. Can anybody point
me to any useful references?

Posted by sno on November 2, 2010, 4:06 pm
 
On 11/2/2010 10:50 AM, andyv wrote:

You might think about insulating the bricks on the inside with
foam...getting some flat plate collectors and blowing the heated air
under the floor...the slab would act somewhat as a heat reservoir and
under floor heating has to be experienced...it is great....

just some thoughts...have fun...sno

--
Correct Scientific Terminology:
Hypothesis - a guess as to why or how something occurs
Theory - a hypothesis that has been checked by enough experiments
  to be generally assumed to be true.
Law - a hypothesis that has been checked by enough experiments
  in enough different ways that it is assumed to be truer then a theory.
Note: nothing is proven in science, things are assumed to be true.


Posted by Josepi on November 2, 2010, 10:01 pm
 Second that one!!

I have installed in-concrete hydronic heating in my house in the basement
floor. Best thing we ever did.

Cover the walls with blue or green (PT) 2x4" and have it foamed or coat
walls with at least 2" rigid foam (R10). If you have no dampness under a
rubber mat in the basement then 2" foam on floor, also otherwise a
ventilation system on a floating floor may work.

Install PEX heating pipes in the joist spaces with reflective
"double-bubble" reflective insulation to box in the joists, somewhat and a
water heater with a possible large water storage tank. Add some glycol solar
collection panels to assist heating the crawl space.

Think water somehow as it has the best specific heat and ease of
transportation for the buck.



You might think about insulating the bricks on the inside with
foam...getting some flat plate collectors and blowing the heated air
under the floor...the slab would act somewhat as a heat reservoir and
under floor heating has to be experienced...it is great....

just some thoughts...have fun...sno



On 11/2/2010 10:50 AM, andyv wrote:


Posted by (PeteCresswell) on November 2, 2010, 5:59 pm
 Per andyv:

I don't know diddly... but made the mistake of putting fiberglass
insulation between the joists down there in my house.  Same deal:
concrete floor...

My experience is that somehow I created a moisture retention
problem.   The joists started being downright wet.  

My solution so far has been to ventilate the space with a fan
placed in the access door that joins to the furnace/washing
area.... but the Better Half can't understand why we need to blow
perfectly-good heated air into there in the winter.  

So my next move will probably be to install a fan that blows from
the outside.   Whether that situation will result in more or less
energy savings than just pulling out the insulation and not
forcing air is another question....
--
PeteCresswell

Posted by Josepi on November 2, 2010, 10:02 pm
 HRV.  Americans don't seem to be too familiar with them even in the northern
states, NY, Michigan..


Per andyv:

I don't know diddly... but made the mistake of putting fiberglass
insulation between the joists down there in my house.  Same deal:
concrete floor...

My experience is that somehow I created a moisture retention
problem.   The joists started being downright wet.

My solution so far has been to ventilate the space with a fan
placed in the access door that joins to the furnace/washing
area.... but the Better Half can't understand why we need to blow
perfectly-good heated air into there in the winter.

So my next move will probably be to install a fan that blows from
the outside.   Whether that situation will result in more or less
energy savings than just pulling out the insulation and not
forcing air is another question....
--
PeteCresswell



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