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power factor - round 2 - Page 2

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Posted by hubops on March 21, 2013, 10:34 pm
 
On Wed, 20 Mar 2013 20:57:05 -0700 (PDT), philkryder at gmail


device

or less sometimes,

5) every minute or two.

"neighborhood" -  

solenoid opens

hydraulic cylinders...

fail to fire.  

records mins and maxes

an entire 10 hour shift,  

load increases

"over corrected"

It seems that we're talking about fairly small ac motors (?)  
hence  small-ish capacitors (?)   which might have a significant
recovery time (?)
 Are the solenoids trying to pick-up before the capacitors have
recharged ?
  .. just a thought.
 Is there any way to time-delay the solenoids ?
... even for a test  .. ?
   ... dunno.
       John T.  




Posted by philkryder on March 22, 2013, 12:22 am
 
On Wednesday, March 20, 2013 8:57:05 PM UTC-7, philkryder at gmail wrote:

  device to deterimine powerfactor on some "lighly loaded" ac motors.

rovided by others in the group. Thanks for all the help.

- .5 or less sometimes,

than 5) every minute or two.

ghborhood" - i.e. cicuit need to fire control solenoids for hydraulic contr
ols. The motor is a half-horse 120v 60 cycle that drives a hydraulic pump.  
On average - 95% of the time - there is no load - but, when there is a a so
lenoid opens a valve to a hydralic motor and then, other solenoids open val
ves to hydraulic cylinders...

enoids fail to fire. Power factor changes dramatically.

hat records mins and maxes within each one-minute interval.

n over an entire 10 hour shift, rather than the average seen by the Killawa
tt while I happen to be looking.

the load increases and the motor's power factor rises from .5 to .85 causin
g the circuit to be "over corrected"

more background data.

we are off grid.

We're not trying to save money.
We're trying to run more reliably.

Our initial problem was popped breakers due to the high current flow due to
 the imaginary current.

thus the power factor correction.

step 1 was to remove the caps. - done.

I still have the question "what happens when the caps are in place and the  
motor's power factor improves to .85 from the average .5?



Posted by j on March 22, 2013, 8:16 pm
 On 3/21/2013 8:22 PM, philkryder@gmail.com wrote:

device to deterimine powerfactor on some "lighly loaded" ac motors.

provided by others in the group. Thanks for all the help.

or less sometimes,

5) every minute or two.

"neighborhood" - i.e. cicuit need to fire control solenoids for hydraulic
controls. The motor is a half-horse 120v 60 cycle that drives a hydraulic pump.
On average - 95% of the time - there is no load - but, when there is a a
solenoid opens a valve to a hydralic motor and then, other solenoids open valves
to hydraulic cylinders...


Solenoids fail to fire. Power factor changes dramatically.

records mins and maxes within each one-minute interval.

over an entire 10 hour shift, rather than the average seen by the Killawatt
while I happen to be looking.


load increases and the motor's power factor rises from .5 to .85 causing the
circuit to be "over corrected"


the imaginary current.

motor's power factor improves to .85 from the average .5?

That power factor was inductive before. What you don't know for sure is  
whether with the caps and the loaded motor whether it had become  
capacitive. I think it may have, particularly if you had compensated to  
a PF of 1.

You have a complex system,if you were on grid the grid would absorb the  
resulting voltage spike. But your inverter has to deal with that and  
what it does is unknown. Have you considered a DC pump?

Posted by Jim Wilkins on March 22, 2013, 8:45 pm
 
Or an accumulator?
http://www.engineersedge.com/hydraulic/accumulator_equations.htm  






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