Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

simple stirling hot air engine made at home with simple tools ,2 cans a baloon - Page 4

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Posted by harry k on December 22, 2011, 5:42 am
 

<snip>

Nope.  ICE has the "heat" (gas due to explosion) applied directly to
the piston.

Stirling has to have the 'heat' applied to the enclosed working fluid
and then to the piston.

That extra conversion step is there.

Rather a minor point though.

Harry K

Posted by Morris Dovey on December 22, 2011, 7:42 am
 
On 12/21/11 11:42 PM, harry k wrote:


Now I see what you're saying, and what it was that I should have made
more clear...

The gas in this Stirling /is/ the piston - there are no other moving
components.*

While the gas in the ICE cylinder is heated from its cold extreme to its
hot extreme for every power stroke, this is not the case in this Stirling.

The heating in this Stirling is continuous and only enough to make up
for that amount of heat energy actually converted to mechanical energy
(plus efficiency losses). The gas /stays/ hot for the entire duration of
the run, and its temperature varies only a small amount (less than 10C)
over the course of a cycle.


Nope, the energy conversion is still thermal -> mechanical. To my
knowledge there is no form of energy called "working fluid".


Ok. :-)

*The engine /could/ run with only air (instead of only supercritical
water) but would produce a lot less power, and air would not provide any
means of producing the ion concentration needed for MHD electrical
generation. Supercritical water turns out to be a super-solvent for
almost anything we might want to use as an ionizing agent.

--
Morris Dovey
http://www.iedu.com/Solar/Electricity/

Posted by harry k on December 22, 2011, 4:24 pm
 
Okay, you are way over my "shade tree" engineering status :)

Harry K

Posted by Morris Dovey on December 22, 2011, 5:58 pm
 On 12/22/11 10:24 AM, harry k wrote:


I'm pretty well over my own head with this stuff. I've had some serious
help from this group. I've forgotten who, but someone was insistent that
I needed to get a copy of Steam Tables, and back in the Appendix I
stumbled onto a plot of some Russian lab data that led me to go digging
in Wikipedia. The upshot of all that was what I've shown on the web page at

    http://www.iedu.com/Solar/Engines/Hydrodyne/AntoineEq.html

I'd just finished puzzling out how to use that information to make a
hugely more efficient solar engine - see

    http://www.iedu.com/Solar/Engines/Hydradyne/

for a glimpse of the thought process and the design progression. I think
it's a hoot that I'd even considered a nuclear power source, since it
was only another month or two before someone here made me aware of
Rossi's E-CAT fusion reactor success.

At that point I realized that instead of putting the engine's hot head
inside a reactor, a tiny reactor could actually be located inside the
engine right where the heat is needed - and that led immediately to what
I show at the bottom of

    http://www.iedu.com/Solar/Electricity/

I could never have sat down and produced that from scratch - but when
taken one little piece at a time and with helpful nudges from friends,
it's a lot easier.

You do realize, of course, that I'm /not/ an engineer?

--
Morris Dovey
http://www.iedu.com/Solar/Electricity/

Posted by Jim Wilkins on December 31, 2011, 3:29 pm
 

I just stumbled onto this warning:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrophoricity
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raney_nickel

jsw



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