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solar charging up a 48 VDC lead acid lawnmower pack - Page 2

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Posted by danny burstein on July 20, 2014, 11:21 am
 


True enough, there are plenty of options for 12V charging,
but that would complicate matters - especially when there
are otehr people involved.

I'm looking for a simple "just plug this cord in" choice,
which would mean a charger for 48V..




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_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
             dannyb@panix.com  
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]

Posted by Jim Wilkins on July 20, 2014, 11:33 am
 

Then I can't help you since my personal alternate energy systems  
achieve low initial and operating cost by intelligent user monitoring  
and intervention.
-jsw  



Posted by Ron Rosenfeld on July 20, 2014, 12:09 pm
 

It seems to me that if the battery bank will only power the mower for 15-20 minutes per day, whoever is using it might be better off  using a hand mower.  There are also robotic electric mowers, but they are more expensive.

To design this, the important information you have not provided includes
   The power consumption of your mower.
   How much time per day the mower will be used.
   The solar insolation ("effective" sun hours) for the worst month during which you will be using your machine, given the orientation and shading of the location where you will mount your panels.

If you want to take a chance, and buy something without really knowing the above information on the chance that it might work, take a look at http://www.tektrumcorp.com/premium_solar_charging_kits.htm   They make a line of 48V kits for charging golf cart batteries, which include all the components you might need and could probably be adapted to your needs (or you can buy the components separately if that works out better in terms of putting the panels on top of a shed instead of on top of the "golf cart".)

Posted by danny burstein on July 20, 2014, 2:25 pm
 

True enough, but I wanted to keep the post simple..


Just about exactly perfect for my uses. And the price is in
the ballpark. Thanks.  

--  
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
             dannyb@panix.com  
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]

Posted by danny burstein on July 20, 2014, 3:39 pm
 

I replaced two of them last year and then, due to a fire (see below)
that destroyed the others, I swapped them as well.

I could probably get about a half hour out of them nowadays but
my own back and leg issues limit me to 10 minutes, so that works
out well.

- Pushing a lawn mower (at least over level ground) is just
about perfect for keeping my back and leg from locking up. I can
lean into it, there's just the right resistance, the vibration
helps, too...

Anyway, in regards to the fire: The series wiring (6 inch or
so cables) between the batteries uses... slip on/friction tabs.

A lawnmower is the poster child for a vibrating platform.

One of the wires (well, the others, too..) came loose enough
that it was sparking at the battery tab. I didn't realize
this was happening or how bad it was until...

.. until I turned it off for a bit to remove the collector
bag and dump it out. I turned back around and there was
a small fire coming through the plastic top of the unit.

I carefully (yes, I even had goggles...) moved it aside
and saw that the corners of two batteries had light flames
on them.

I was able to put it out... inspected things very carefully,
replaced the two batteries and the burnt out wiring,
and everything was and has been fine.

Except that... there was one "extra" wire just sticking
out. I couldn't figure out where it should go, so capped
it and tried my luck. The unit worked and charged fine.

In another thread over at alt.home.repair dealing with
a plug in electric lawn mower.. someone mentioned that
these would be used to (when the mower gets shut
down) to redirect electron flow, so to speak, turn
the motor into a generator, and just about instantly
stop the mower blade.

And sure enough, when I saw that I realized my unit
was now "free wheeling" quite a bit longer than in
the past. By "quite a bit" I mean 10 or so seconds,
so for now I'm living with it. One of these days
I'll try to figure out where that wire should go.

http://www.dburstein.com/images/battery-fire.png  
  

--  
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
             dannyb@panix.com  
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]

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