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Electric AC Compressor in Dixie - Page 10

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Posted by Elmo P. Shagnasty on May 23, 2011, 8:42 pm
 
In article


I believe the discussion was braking performance and your specific lack
of data on that issue--a lack of data which did not prevent you from
declaring that "braking distance was OK because I let the ABS kick in".

You are SUCH a tool...

Posted by bwilson4web on May 23, 2011, 10:44 pm
 
wrote:

"Electric AC Compressor in Dixie" is the thread title. Regardless,
I'll start a fresh thread once I get some technical details from the
vendor on their 1.5kW inverter.

Bob Wilson


Posted by Steve on May 23, 2011, 11:35 pm
 On Mon, 23 May 2011 15:44:14 -0700 (PDT), bwilson4web =
put together some random words that came up with:


I would sorta doubt that DC-DC inverter would sustain a 125A continuous =
draw,
unless there was some way to dissapate the heat.  Some experimentation =
here
might be in order.  Cranking up the current load until 125A is reached.

Have you ever looked into the idea of running an inverter off the =
traction
battery?  If so, what sort of current could the MG supply?

Steve

Posted by Daniel who wants to know on May 24, 2011, 12:11 am
 
The DC-DC converter (not inverter) is part of the main inverter and is
liquid cooled.


He doesn't have to, that is what http://www.priups.com  is for



Posted by Steve on May 25, 2011, 12:53 am
 On Mon, 23 May 2011 19:11:40 -0500, "Daniel who wants to know" =
together some random words that came up with:


No! No!  I mean Traction Battery (180v/375 Volts) -> 120V/240V 60Hz (an
inverter).

It would be a nice Sr. project for a talented EE student.  A conventional=
 3
phase boost switching converter into a 480v 3 Phase-> single phase =
transformer
(kinda like they have on power poles, but smaller).

You can get them here:
http://www.electricalpowertransformer.com/acme/group-3g.html

I don't know how high the traction battery gets, but for a simple =
inverter, a
single phase boost converter to 277V to a stepdown 120V/240 transformer =
should
do the trick.

With the 3 phase, you need smaller thyristors.

You have to get to 60 Hz anyway, so why not do it in one step instead of =
3? Much
more efficient.

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