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PIC: THE WOZ of APPLE says his 2010 PRIUS has SOFTWARE probs

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Posted by JLA on February 2, 2010, 11:31 pm
 


Here's Toyota's line: its two recalls for floormats and sticking
accelerator
pedals should cover all potential cases of sudden
unintended acceleration in its
batch of recalled vehicles. Both
recalls are for mechanical issues, and Toyota
spokesman John Hanson
claims, "After man years of exhaustive testing we have not
found
any evidence of an electronic [software] problem that would have led
to
unwanted acceleration."

Enter Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple and a jolly
guy who knows a
thing or two about software. While speaking at the Discovery
Forum
2010, the Woz claimed that his 2010 Prius, which is not a part of
either
recall, has an accelerator that "goes wild but only under
certain conditions of
cruise control." He also claimed that it's
repeatable. Though Woz said he has
tried to contact both Toyota and
the National Highway Traffic Safety Institute,
neither has reportedly
investigated his claim.

Why is this news? Because
despite Toyota's claim that any potential
risk for sudden unintentional
acceleration in its recalled vehicles
is mechanically related, there are
lingering reports of other cases,
including ones involving vehicles not affected
by either recall, that
could be software-related. Proving that software caused
an instance of
sudden acceleration is tricky, so the fact that Woz claims he can
repeat the issue makes his case appear to be one worth investigating.
 
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Posted by ransley on February 3, 2010, 12:59 pm
 


On Feb 2, 5:31pm, i...@jlaenterprises-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (JLA)
wrote:

Today [Associated Press] I read of over 100 Prius brake complaints in
Tokyo. If the acceleration issue is electronic related this issue is
far from over and will be a giant mess. The NHSTI is looking into many
issues but wont comment untill it has completed its investigation.
Which is the right way to do it. I cant imagine what would need to be
done if this was electronic related, the cost would be very large per
car. What I see possibly is several electronic issues or one effecting
many different systems in only specific situations.

Posted by gnu / linux on February 3, 2010, 6:37 pm
 

On Feb 2, 5:31pm, i...@jlaenterprises-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (JLA)
wrote:

IMO the regenerative braking / ABS system on the 2010 Prius is less
than ideal but working as designed ...

Posted by ransley on February 3, 2010, 10:50 pm
 


Working as designed. Until it fails, you cant stop and hit something.
So its not working as designed, nor is Steve Wozniaks prius, who out
of all complainants is the only one that to me proves somethings
wrong. He said on tv today he has been ignored by Toyota and HTSB, he
wont ignored anymore, I bet he is world news tonight, the Apple genius.

Posted by JLA on February 3, 2010, 11:03 pm
 


 > JLA wrote:
 > Here's Toyota's line: its two recalls for floormats and
sticking
accelerator pedals should cover all potential cases of sudden
unintended acceleration in its batch of recalled vehicles. Both
recalls are for
mechanical issues, and Toyota spokesman John Hanson
claims, "After man years of
exhaustive testing we have not found
any evidence of an electronic [software]
problem that would have led
to unwanted acceleration."
 >
 > Enter Steve
Wozniak, co-founder of Apple and a jolly guy who knows
a thing or two about
software. While speaking at the Discovery Forum
2010, the Woz claimed that his
2010 Prius, which is not a part of
either recall, has an accelerator that "goes
wild but only under
certain conditions of cruise control." He also claimed that
it's
repeatable. Though Woz said he has tried to contact both Toyota and
the
National Highway Traffic Safety Institute, neither has reportedly
investigated
his claim.
 >
 > Why is this news? Because despite Toyota's claim that any
potential
risk for sudden unintentional acceleration in its recalled vehicles is
mechanically related, there are lingering reports of other cases,
including ones
involving vehicles not affected by either recall, that
could be
software-related. Proving that software caused an instance of
sudden
acceleration is tricky, so the fact that Woz claims he can
repeat the issue
makes his case appear to be one worth
investigating.

Steve Wozniak update about
his problems with
his beloved Toyota Prius, its faulty acceleration software,
and his
problems reporting this to both Toyota and the National Highway
Traffic
Safety Administration. He's frustrated, and completely
right.

"    Here's the
latest news I just got.

    Once again, thanks for your time. We called Toyota
with your
issue, and so far the spokesperson's comment is that they haven't
heard anything to do with cruise control in Priuses. The story is
still in
edits, and if and when it runs, I will email you a copy at
this address.

  
This response is what I've been coming up against for 2 months,
and it doesn't
indicate that I'll even be contacted about my problem.
I sure am thankful now
for the good attention I get at the normal
Genius bars!
"

Then he added this
about how frustrating the whole process is:

 "   I have expensive cars but
prefer to drive my Segway and
Prius's for many reasons. I have had many models
of Prius and enough
family members and staff to keep them all in use.

    I
have a very busy schedule and I'm usually free at midnight to
deal with things
like this. The NHTSA online reporting form doesn't
fit my case. It asks things
like the date of an accident. On the
phone they refer me to a second number. At
that number they need my
VIN and mileage before they'll listen. The person on
the phone sounds
like a typical very low paid clerk who can ask specific
questions to
type things into a database, and have no interest in the urgency
and
connection of my problem to the crashes/deaths/recalls/halted sales.
In
fact, they make it clear that they are just taking data and not
doing anything
themselves to remedy a safety issue. That's the
government.

    Toyota is
difficult too, but after some phone calls I managed to
express some of my
situation. Unfortunately my iPhone dropped the
calls twice and I never got a
reference number but they may have some
sort of ticket open.

    It's been 2
months trying to have all the data and freedom, trying
to get to someone high
enough up to give this some attention. You
can't easily find phone numbers to
companies online. I'd give
anything to have had the phone number of Toyota's
legal department.
They'll see that I stated my discovery in writing 2 months ago
but a
local dealer couldn't understand the significance of it and sort of
thought my wife was nuts. I was out of town, as usual, at that time.
It's not
easy to be heard on something like this. But today I
addressed an education
group (Sausalito Discovery Museum) and somehow
a brief form of this story came
out and I believe that someone there
contacted CNET.

    Tonight I heard from
Bloomberg news in Asia that they are
following up on it with a story and that
they will contact Toyota
directly about it. I wouldn't be surprised to get a
call from Toyota
tomorrow, but I'll be on the road in that car all day.

    No,
my problem is not deadly. It's not a sticky accelerator pedal,
for sure. It's
sticky acceleration that is scary the first time but
has a good work-around. "

Isn't it amazing that someone—being Steve Wozniak or John Doe—is
having these
problems, and nobody in the company is doing anything
about it, pronto. It may
not be deadly, as the Woz puts it, but two
months to get a response from a car
company on an issue that affects
the safety of their cars is inexcusable.

WAY
TO GO TOYOTA


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