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Simple Solar Calc

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Posted by ABLE1 on June 29, 2010, 2:53 am
 
Hello,

Anyone in here have a link for a simple calculator for setting up a solar
system.  I am just looking for coming up with a small panel, charge
controller, and battery to handle a 2.5amp load @ 12vdc 24/7 in a 4.2 zone.
The calculators that I have found are for grid-tie and large systems.  Any
help would be great.

Thanks!!




Posted by Josepi on June 29, 2010, 3:04 am
 
Some of the ones I have used online have factor features to override the
losses incurred in grid-tie and battery systems.

Your calculations should be quite easy. Look for "solar insolation" factors
tables for your area. These tables will give you the expect avarage output
per day with most weather and other factors included.

You will need to calculate you watthour usage and then add a healthy
overdesign factor, depending on your risk allowance for your load. If it is
critical you may want to double or triple it.


Beware of further clone imposters posts. I have a very sick OCD individual
that loves my name.


Hello,

Anyone in here have a link for a simple calculator for setting up a solar
system.  I am just looking for coming up with a small panel, charge
controller, and battery to handle a 2.5amp load @ 12vdc 24/7 in a 4.2 zone.
The calculators that I have found are for grid-tie and large systems.  Any
help would be great.

Thanks!!





Posted by ABLE1 on June 29, 2010, 3:44 am
 Thanks for the input.

I am thinking that to meet my parameters it is going to take quite a bit to
make it happen.
Mainly due to the constant load.

Thanks again.





Posted by Josepi on June 29, 2010, 4:17 am
 Typically in most areas you can count on about 4 hours of solar insolation
per day.

That includes cloudy weather, seasonal changes, and angle of sun throughout
the day on a solar PV surface set at your latitude angle.

so for 2.5A x 12V x 24h = 720 whr per day

dividing by the insolation factor of 4 = 180 Watts of PV panels.

You lose about 40% in lead-acid batteries and say about 20% more in wiring
(use a MPPT) and system and then double or triple it.

180W x 140% x 120% x 2x = 604 Watts of PV panels. Less with a sun tracker
and down to half (No double) if the reliability is not critical.

Battery capacity can be calculated similiarly but beware of the Peukert
factor (push it hard = low capacity) and cold temperatures. These can derate
your battery down to about 10% of rating and wear it out over a short
period.


Thanks for the input.

I am thinking that to meet my parameters it is going to take quite a bit to
make it happen.
Mainly due to the constant load.

Thanks again.





Posted by Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds on June 29, 2010, 4:32 am
 wrote:


Shouldn't that be insolation factor of 6?




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