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Small grid-tie inverters? - Page 6

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Posted by Neon John on June 24, 2008, 4:48 am
 
On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 05:45:42 -0700 (PDT), Maury Markowitz


You can get low voltage heating elements for water heaters.  They're commonly
used as energy dump loads for micro-hydro plants.  No idea of the cost.

John
--
John De Armond
See my website for my current email address
http://www.neon-john.com
http://www.johndearmond.com  <-- best little blog on the net!
Tellico Plains, Occupied TN
Some people are like a Slinky .. not really good for anything
 but you still smile
when you shove them down the stairs.


Posted by We Can Do It on June 24, 2008, 6:44 pm
 

wrote:

================================
Q) I use 30kwhr a day. If I pump 2kwhr back in while the sun
is shining,
how's the power company going to know?

A) If you engineer and build your small grid tie system and
initiate the final connection by GA code, then in accordance
with GA law the power company puts a meter on your house that
tells them how many KWH you provided to the grid. GA power
then charges you to read that meter and by law GA Power pays
you 17.4 cents/KWH for the power you put back into the grid. I
am not saying you will get your investment back, just that it
works this way if you follow the letter of the law and GA
Power pays more for the "green energy" than they charge you
for standard grid energy.

peace
dawg



Posted by BobG on June 25, 2008, 12:04 am
 
==========================
==========================
======
So if my usage per day goes from 30 to 28kwhrs, I'm not providing any
power to the grid, therefore they dont know nuthin.

Posted by Eeyore on June 20, 2008, 10:41 pm
 

We Can Do It wrote:


Phoney economics. It'll never last when the numbers get big unless you
want to pay 30c  / kWh.

Graham


Posted by Neon John on June 22, 2008, 1:10 pm
 

You're kidding, right?  250 watts wouldn't even supply the magnetizing power
for the first pole pig, much less charge a few hundred feet of primary's
capacitance.  It probably wouldn't even supply the phantom loads in the house
itself.

BobG, I'd go looking at semiconductor application notes and then maybe try to
scrounge up a grid-tie inverter schematic.

It actually shouldn't be difficult - just phase-lock the local 60 hz
oscillator to the grid frequency and then make sure you turn on the right
polarity :-) Let the inverter voltage rise above the line until the inverter
is fully loaded.

John
--
John De Armond
See my website for my current email address
http://www.neon-john.com
http://www.johndearmond.com  <-- best little blog on the net!
Tellico Plains, Occupied TN
I'm so cool, I'm afraid to catch cold.


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