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Solar Electric Systems, Entry-Level

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Posted by JimT on May 15, 2011, 10:46 pm
 
These questions are for PV installers.

I just signed up for HART 1071 Solar Electric Systems, Entry-Level42.0 Hour.

Here's, sort of, a course description:
http://www.austincc.edu/ce/renewable/industry.php
Required text:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

The course is 42 hour course that takes almost 3 months with a once a
week, 4 hour class, and lab. Do you think the typical homeowner
(slightly above avg IQ) would be able to install all aspects of a home
PV system after completing such a course, or would he still have to hire
expert help? I know the course description says: "However, the
Certificate by itself does not qualify an individual to install PV
systems." But I think they just put that in there to cover their butts.
The home PV systems I've seen don't look that complicated and, if this
course doesn't teach you all aspects, do you think it's worth the +$00
tuition and texts? My wife wants ME to install the home PV system when
I'm done with the class. My construction experience is limited to home
improvement projects like installing door, floors, walls and some
electrical work like moving switches. Very limited as far as electricity
is concerned.

Jim

Posted by Bob Minchin on May 16, 2011, 7:15 am
 
JimT wrote:

HART 1072 looks more suitable for what you want and repeats parts of
1071 anyway.

What do local regulations require? Here in UK, grid connected solar
systems have to be installed by Microgeneration Certification Scheme
approved installers to get the financial benefits from Solar PV.

Bob

Posted by JimT on May 16, 2011, 2:37 pm
 On 5/16/2011 2:15 AM, Bob Minchin wrote:

Thanks. I already decided to drop the course.

Jim

Posted by LectronNuis on May 30, 2011, 10:03 am
 
<snippD>

As I often read pretty much "anything goes"
in many States in the USA, be it
building, wiring, plumbing, heating, cooling
with an _option_ to "hire a professional".
Seems to me where codes apply, and a
"home handyman" can read, then all that
really need be done is to get through any
inspection by a connecting utility.
And as we all know with that system the way
out is to do it and get _told_ what "bits" require
rectification. The bits "discovered", that is.

Add that to the fact that during the 90's the very
same question in any of these RE groups
would have attracted a wealth of experienced
"DIY installers".
Different times though, and certainly way
different applications to that we see demanded
of RE today.

I applaud the demise of that genre of thinking
as a step forward in where RE is (today) headed.
You, Jim,  have made exactly the most wise of
decisions.. IMO.

As a bottom line I have always advised folk to look
at resale value before "check-book" cost.
Where a professionally designed and installed
RE system is sustaining the dwelling/apparatus then
the value is considerably higher, and offers a better
chance of attracting buyers with less personal problems
to bring to the bargaining table.

In Australia we have yet another scale of regulations
which says "a system installed by a New South
Wales  professional isn't at the same standard as
a system installed by a Queensland professional,
and neither meet the highest standards of the
Western Australian professional".
They are all 'good', tho'... depending on which State
the advice is sought. And of course having a compulsory
standard for rebates and safety issues is way more in
front of "I read the book, done the course and I
now is one Grade A installer!".

hTh

cheers

--

Lectron Nuis




Posted by Mho on June 12, 2011, 3:11 am
 Old news George!

Did you have a point or just trying to find somebody to just listen to you
tooting your own horn?
--------------

"LectronNuis."  wrote in message
As I often read pretty much "anything goes"
in many States in the USA, be it
building, wiring, plumbing, heating, cooling
with an _option_ to "hire a professional".
Seems to me where codes apply, and a
"home handyman" can read, then all that
really need be done is to get through any
inspection by a connecting utility.
And as we all know with that system the way
out is to do it and get _told_ what "bits" require
rectification. The bits "discovered", that is.

Add that to the fact that during the 90's the very
same question in any of these RE groups
would have attracted a wealth of experienced
"DIY installers".
Different times though, and certainly way
different applications to that we see demanded
of RE today.

I applaud the demise of that genre of thinking
as a step forward in where RE is (today) headed.
You, Jim,  have made exactly the most wise of
decisions.. IMO.

As a bottom line I have always advised folk to look
at resale value before "check-book" cost.
Where a professionally designed and installed
RE system is sustaining the dwelling/apparatus then
the value is considerably higher, and offers a better
chance of attracting buyers with less personal problems
to bring to the bargaining table.

In Australia we have yet another scale of regulations
which says "a system installed by a New South
Wales  professional isn't at the same standard as
a system installed by a Queensland professional,
and neither meet the highest standards of the
Western Australian professional".
They are all 'good', tho'... depending on which State
the advice is sought. And of course having a compulsory
standard for rebates and safety issues is way more in
front of "I read the book, done the course and I
now is one Grade A installer!".

hTh

cheers

--

Lectron Nuis




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