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World's largest solar array planned for the Sahara Desert - Page 2

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Posted by Joesepi on September 5, 2009, 2:47 am
 
It would be interesting to hear what the actual losses are, financially,
after a few years of running a large installation like these.



Posted by BobG on September 5, 2009, 3:02 am
 

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Pure guesstimate: 11kw system at about $/watt, looks like about a
$0K system. If juice cost $.15/kw up there, and he generates about
40kw a day, or $ or so, it will take about 32 years to get into the
black. Longer if juce is cheaper or system costs more. Seems like a
looong time. Not so long compared to the age of the barn though.

Posted by philo on September 5, 2009, 5:39 am
 BobG wrote:

Though I did a "quick calc" once and came up with 20 years or so...
he claims 15 (which I honestly think is over-optimistic)


However my question is: how long will the solar panels last?

Posted by Joesepi on September 5, 2009, 4:17 pm
 $0K (initial outlay only) x 5% per annum financial investment losses / 365
days = $.58 per day in lost investment interest or loan interest.

He could never break even at those grid rates and we haven't considered any
maintenance costs or the financial market making a comback.

I hope he didn't mortgage a house or cash a pension for this expensive
hobby.




==============================================
Pure guesstimate: 11kw system at about $/watt, looks like about a
$0K system. If juice cost $.15/kw up there, and he generates about
40kw a day, or $ or so, it will take about 32 years to get into the
black. Longer if juce is cheaper or system costs more. Seems like a
looong time. Not so long compared to the age of the barn though.



Posted by AES on September 5, 2009, 4:41 pm
 
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Additional factors that need to be considered in these kinds of
calculations -- especially for residences that actually use the solar
generated power to substitute for utility grid power, rather than
selling a lot of it:

1)  In many areas residential rates are steeply tiered: start at 10+
cents/kwh, rapidly jump to 20+ cents, then 35 cents.

2)  And are likely to increase (sharply?) in future years.

3)  And are paid with after-tax homeowner dollars, whereas that "lost
investment interest or loan interest" would likely have been taxable
income, one way or another.

4)  And, there's a reasonable chance that some fraction of the initial
investment will be recovered on eventual resale of the residence.  (No
guarantee of this, of course -- but my guess is there's a good chance of
this.)

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