Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

all in one solar panel

register ::  Login Password  :: Lost Password?
Posted by FAQmeister on February 11, 2005, 11:17 pm
 
I've seen solar panels that contain everything you need to plug them
directly into a wall socket and start saving some money, but I can't
find them now.

Anyone?

--
Buford T. Justice



Posted by tater schuld on February 12, 2005, 12:15 am
 
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=guerrilla+solar

looks like it is deemed illegal at first glance.

--
Tater
KC9ESF
NAR #79654 L1
AMA #747769
EAA #703312


Posted by Mel on February 14, 2005, 10:04 am
 In the Netherlands, Greenpeace in conjunction with someone (don't
remember who) in the Netherlands developed exactly that. A 100w or
module with an appropriate inverter (an OK4 I think), with a wall plug,
that you could (at the time) buy and plug in directly to a wall socket.

I don't know why they stopped, but I suspect it had to do with:
- price
- legal issues (normally it's not that simple, getting legally connected =

to the grid as an electricity producer)
- possibly reliability, but I'm not sure about this one.

Maybe someone on the list from that area could give more details.



Mel






tater schuld a crit :


Posted by Solar Guppy on February 14, 2005, 4:20 pm
 The OK4U and Trace MicroSine(1997-1999) are one in the same. The unit didn't
meet UL1741 requirements and from my sources had issues with harmonic
distortion as well. The units were always made in the Netherlands and wasn't
accepted in neighboring EU countries either

Every now and then they pop-up on eBay but I would recommend you stay away
from them ... there are better options (Used Sunties) for similar money that
are UL1741 certified

www.solar-guppy.com/forum


In the Netherlands, Greenpeace in conjunction with someone (don't
remember who) in the Netherlands developed exactly that. A 100w or
module with an appropriate inverter (an OK4 I think), with a wall plug,
that you could (at the time) buy and plug in directly to a wall socket.

I don't know why they stopped, but I suspect it had to do with:
- price
- legal issues (normally it's not that simple, getting legally connected
to the grid as an electricity producer)
- possibly reliability, but I'm not sure about this one.

Maybe someone on the list from that area could give more details.



Mel






tater schuld a écrit :


Posted by Anthony Matonak on February 12, 2005, 12:41 am
 FAQmeister wrote:

Here in California, grid tied inverters have to be meet strict UL
specifications (1741 I think). These specs don't specifically outlaw
such devices but I'm told that for the small inverters that would bolt
on to individual panels, it's not worth it for the manufacturers.
That is, it costs more to get them certified than they'll ever get
back in profits.

Anthony

This Thread
Bookmark this thread:
 
 
 
 
 
 
  •  
  • Subject
  • Author
  • Date
please rate this thread