Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

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Posted by JudyS on March 6, 2011, 4:15 pm
 
I've been looking over grid-tied photovoltiac-enphase systems in the 4 to 5
kw range.  I'm really taken with the enphase inverters.  They look perfect
except for the possibility of the grid going down for long periods.  

Is there any economical way to add battery backup in case the grid drops
out?  Is there another system that would be better suited for this
possibility?




Posted by m II on March 6, 2011, 6:56 pm
 



I've been looking over grid-tied photovoltiac-enphase systems in the 4 to 5
kw range.  I'm really taken with the enphase inverters.  They look perfect
except for the possibility of the grid going down for long periods.

Is there any economical way to add battery backup in case the grid drops
out?  Is there another system that would be better suited for this
possibility?


--

Co-gen circuits, typically, do not have facilities for a battery storage
system. An automatic disconnect and transfer system is also required for
this.

If you go decent batteries they will cost you more than the energy would
cost from the grid for the rest of your life.



mike



Posted by Ron Rosenfeld on March 6, 2011, 7:13 pm
 

If your energy requirements are substantial, and the power outages infrequent, a
fossil-fueled generator with a whole-house automatic transfer switch would
probably be the best way to go.

If you want to go into this in more depth, then you'll need to provide a lot
more information about energy usage, solar insolation, expected grid failure
frequency and duration; how long a battery backup do you require?  etc.  And, if
you have a power outage that exceeds those parameters, you'll need a fossil-fuel
generator anyway (or go without).

Posted by Norman Peelman on March 6, 2011, 11:52 pm
 JudyS wrote:

   The ratio of the number of brown/black outs to the number of
batteries/maintenance needed is severely lopsided. Batteries need
replacing and are very expensive.


--
Norman
Registered Linux user #461062
AMD64X2 6400+ Ubuntu 8.04 64bit

Posted by Randy on March 7, 2011, 3:29 am
 

Welcome to the Group!
Perhaps you might consider the Outback GFXor Zantrax XW grid intertie
inverters with a small battery bank to keep the power on when an outage
occurs.
My Outback FX2524T will run on two Wal-Mart RV deep cycles for $4.00 a
piece. As long as the sun shines, you will be able to use the solar you have
installed when the power is down. But after sundown, the batteries would
take care of lighting at best till the grid is restored. More battery
reserve does equal more cost and bother (I like to be bothered).
A nice compromise would be to add a built in generator that either the
Outback or Zantrax can control, might work for you, running only to recharge
the batteries as needed till sunrise.
Or as the other gentleman said a generator would work fine with your
Enphase, it would just run the whole time the grid is down while your solar
panels twiddle their thumbs in the sun (pick a quiet one please.)
Otherwise maybe just hooking a UPS up to your critical appliances might be
sufficient.
I have heard from others that had grid tie only systems purchased a battery
charger/ cheap inverter and battery for emergency use. Just size the battery
and inverter to your load and usage (with extra to spare).
Much of this depends on your load needs, reliability of the grid in your
locality and the amount of money in your purse.
I live in an Ice storm prone area so for me, lots of backup makes sense.
Hope this helps.
Randy



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