Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

Anyone interested in building cheap DIY parabolic troughs? - Page 2

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Posted by Morris Dovey on November 14, 2008, 3:34 pm
 
azuredu wrote:

Nor to me - that's why I was so interested in how you were solving that
problem. I really was looking for a solution - not a disagreement...


Very true. My primary application is for regions where there may be no
electrical infrastructure at all, and requiring any kind of
electricity-generating subsystem is not an option.


:) But I don't _need_ hot water (or even steam). We are addressing very
different requirements. BTW, 325C is a measure of temperature, not of
heat - although it works to think of temperature as a measure of heat
(energy) /density/.


Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Morris Dovey on November 14, 2008, 4:07 pm
 
Morris Dovey wrote:


My apologies - it didn't occur to me until after I hit <send> that you
might find more information about the specific application helpful in
understanding what I'm doing.

The second drawing at

    http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Fluidyne.html

Is of a fluidyne (Stirling cycle heat engine) under development. The
heat produced is used to expand the air within the engine and is then
discarded to cause the air within the engine to contract.

This expansion/contraction provides a direct conversion from solar
energy to mechanical energy that can be used for a number of
applications (such as pumping and refrigeration) in regions where there
is neither fuel nor electricity available.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by azuredu on November 14, 2008, 4:32 pm
 

Yes, I am greatly interested in that. Do you have a working model?
What is the cost and efficiency projection?


Posted by Morris Dovey on November 14, 2008, 4:46 pm
 azuredu wrote:

We have a working model only of the low-temperature version shown at the
bottom of

    http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Dyne.html

The fins have been removed from the cold end of the regenerator tube and
both the hot head and the regenerator are now wrapped with fiberglass
wool - and the materials cost of that engine is just under $00. We
don't have the means to acquire the data needed to calculate efficiency,
but have set a target of 25% or greater.

Since I last updated the web site I've started design and software
modeling activity for a version of the high-temperature engine that uses
air only (no fluid) which I've labeled a "dryadyne". I'm hoping that by
eliminating the fluid component altogether, efficiency will be
significantly improved and maintenance eliminated completely.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by azuredu on November 14, 2008, 5:22 pm
 

I should be missing something, but how do you do to output the
mechanical work?


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