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Constructing collectors for a solar hot water system - Page 6

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Posted by nicksanspam on January 1, 2008, 9:09 pm
 


I wouldn't expect moisture behind glazing in a sunspace, and a collector
screwed flat to a house wall wouldn't lose lots of heat, even without
the osb+foamboard. Can we pound 3 10'x1/2" copper pipes into an unslit
2'x10' piece of aluminum coil stock over a 3-pipe 1x3 U-form without
lots of wrinkling?

Nick


Posted by Morris Dovey on January 1, 2008, 9:54 pm
 
nicksanspam@ece.villanova.edu wrote:
|
|| I think you might find OSB particularly unsatisfying for this
|| design because of difficulty in joining sheets at edges - and
|| because the stuff reverts to "tree puke" when exposed to moisture.
|
| I wouldn't expect moisture behind glazing in a sunspace, and a
| collector screwed flat to a house wall wouldn't lose lots of heat,
| even without the osb+foamboard. Can we pound 3 10'x1/2" copper
| pipes into an unslit 2'x10' piece of aluminum coil stock over a
| 3-pipe 1x3 U-form without lots of wrinkling?

If you screw OSB flat to an outside wall, it /will/ be subject to
moisture (independent of your expectations <g>) - and you (or whoever
owns/uses the structure) will not be pleased with _any_ of the
behaviors it then exhibits.

You need something more mechanically durable than is possible with
edge-joined OSB just to lift the collector into position to be screwed
to the wall. You might want to touch base with the folks over in
news:rec.woodworking for confirmation.

I'll leave the metal-forming question for others who have enough
experience to give you a good answer. My (ignorant) guess is that you
could if you worked very slowly and very carefully, but that building
a press of some kind (check Gary's photos of his press) would produce
much better results, much faster. Why don't you give it a try and let
us share your learning experience. Please take photos - I'm a "visual
learner".

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/



Posted by nicksanspam on January 2, 2008, 11:12 am
 

Where would this moisture come from, in a glazed sunspace with no rain leaks
and a vapor barrier on the ground and controls that only circulate house air
through the sunspace when every surface is warmer than the dew point and lots
of solar cooking?

Nick


Posted by Morris Dovey on January 2, 2008, 12:34 pm
 nicksanspam@ece.villanova.edu wrote:
|
|||| ... the stuff reverts to "tree puke" when exposed to moisture.
|||
||| I wouldn't expect moisture behind glazing in a sunspace...
|
|| If you screw OSB flat to an outside wall, it /will/ be subject to
|| moisture
|
| Where would this moisture come from, in a glazed sunspace with no
| rain leaks and a vapor barrier on the ground and controls that only
| circulate house air through the sunspace when every surface is
| warmer than the dew point and lots of solar cooking?

From the circulated humid house air producing condensation between
sunset and sunrise and from gaps/imperfections in your panel-to-wall
seal. With OSB, the solar cooking between sunrise and sunset will not
_repair_ the damage done during the previous half of the daily cycle.

Note that I'm less questioning that your design will perform for the
first week than I am that it will remain intact to perform at the end
of the second year - and perhaps it's all a matter of whether one is
considering elegance of concept or practicality of implementation.
Since your box has only a top and bottom (but no sides) I should
probably say: "Nice concept!" and walk away... :-)

I'd still really like to see two sheets of 1/2" OSB edge-joined in any
way that delivers mechanical integrity. That's information I can put
to immediate use!

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/



Posted by Solar Flare on January 2, 2008, 1:29 pm
 You purchase the strips that are made to do that job by the
manufacturer. I have no problem with my joints in the middle of 24"
truss centres. They do show from the street a bit, which breaks the
nice even pattern. The joiners take up some width space and do not
allow for the stock sheets to be on 48" centres without trimming. That
was a mistake.

A cross rib board placed every 6-8 fett may help if you don't trust
the joiner.




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