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Corrosion inhibitor

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Posted by jeff on July 15, 2010, 8:14 pm
 
I'm considering using a steel tank filled with water as a radiator for
home space heating.  The tank will be heated with a solar hot water
loop by way of a heat exchanger.  The tank is 3/16" to 1/4" thick.  I
plan to fill it with distilled water.

My first thought was that steel that thick wouldn't rust through for
decades but I really have no way to judge.  Does anyone have
suggestions for an anti-corrosion, anti-rust additive for the water?

Posted by Josepi on July 16, 2010, 12:53 am
 
Most auto antifreezes have rust inhibitors in them. Perhaps the chemical
could be isolated and used for your app.


I'm considering using a steel tank filled with water as a radiator for
home space heating.  The tank will be heated with a solar hot water
loop by way of a heat exchanger.  The tank is 3/16" to 1/4" thick.  I
plan to fill it with distilled water.

My first thought was that steel that thick wouldn't rust through for
decades but I really have no way to judge.  Does anyone have
suggestions for an anti-corrosion, anti-rust additive for the water?



Posted by jeff on July 16, 2010, 3:01 pm
 I had thoughts of using a rust & corrosion inhibitor like the ones
made by most of the auto antifreeze manufacturers.  Has anyone tried
them in a similar situation?

I think with a static water volume (no new water introduced) there
would be only so much oxygen and that would reduce rust formation.
Any way to tell how long steel would last?

Posted by dow on July 21, 2010, 2:26 pm
 
Steel riusts even in water with zero oxygen dissolved in it,
especially if other metals such as copper are present. Electric
currents flow between the two metals, causing the iron to be oxidized
and hydrogen to be liberated at the surface of the copper. Some of the
water is broken down into hydrogen and oxygen.

Using car-radiator antifreeze should help a lot.

     dow

Posted by Josepi on July 21, 2010, 3:27 pm
 Then it has oxygen dissolved in it.

no oxygen = no rust

Dissimiliar metals is a good point but doesn't happen in hydronic heating
systems with iron, brass, aluminum and stainless steel over 100 years old.



Steel riusts even in water with zero oxygen dissolved in it,
especially if other metals such as copper are present. Electric
currents flow between the two metals, causing the iron to be oxidized
and hydrogen to be liberated at the surface of the copper. Some of the
water is broken down into hydrogen and oxygen.

Using car-radiator antifreeze should help a lot.

     dow



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