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Corrosion inhibitor - Page 2

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Posted by You on July 21, 2010, 6:28 pm
 
In article


Bzzzzt, Wrong answer, Would you like to try for what is behind Door No.3

Apparently you have NEVER tried to get water to disassociate. If it was
this easy, the WORLD would be running on Hydrogen as a fuel, already...
Best go back and read up on the chemistry of Water Cracking. It really
takes a LOT of energy to make it happen, and there just is NOT anywhere
near that kind of energy in dissimilar metal electrolysis, or Rusting
the inside of a Steel Tank, with water in it.

Posted by Josepi on July 22, 2010, 1:40 am
 
Molecular chemistry only, not atomic happenning!


In article


Bzzzzt, Wrong answer, Would you like to try for what is behind Door No.3

Apparently you have NEVER tried to get water to disassociate. If it was
this easy, the WORLD would be running on Hydrogen as a fuel, already...
Best go back and read up on the chemistry of Water Cracking. It really
takes a LOT of energy to make it happen, and there just is NOT anywhere
near that kind of energy in dissimilar metal electrolysis, or Rusting
the inside of a Steel Tank, with water in it.



Posted by dow on July 22, 2010, 1:55 am
 
Oh nonsense! Metals that are more electropositive than hydrogen will
displace hydrogen from water, given appropriate conditions. Drop
metallic calcium into water and the hydrogen will fizz from it. Drop
potassium in and the heat released will set the hydrogen on fire.

If metallic calcium were a common mineral, the world might run on
hydrogen made that way. But it isn't.

Iron is more electropositive than hydrogen, but not greatly so.
Nevertheless, if a dissimilar metal is present, with a lower
electropositivity, hydrogen will be released from water and the iron
will be oxidized.

Yes, you could in theory make a car that uses iron as its fuel,
generating hydrogen along the way. But iron is more expensive than the
equivalent quantity of oil.

Ships are often protected from corrosion by having pieces of metal
that are *more* electropositive than iron attached to their hulls.
Aluminum is often used. The aluminum gets oxidized, and has to be
replaced periodically. The steel hull becomes the cathode of the
process, and is not oxidized.

Maybe the Original Poster of this thread should do the same kind of
thing. Attach pieces of aluminum to the inside of his tank, and
replace them from time to time.

      dow


Posted by Josepi on July 22, 2010, 2:14 am
 Is that where all the heat energy comes from in a hydronic boiler system?



Oh nonsense! Metals that are more electropositive than hydrogen will
displace hydrogen from water, given appropriate conditions. Drop
metallic calcium into water and the hydrogen will fizz from it. Drop
potassium in and the heat released will set the hydrogen on fire.

If metallic calcium were a common mineral, the world might run on
hydrogen made that way. But it isn't.

Iron is more electropositive than hydrogen, but not greatly so.
Nevertheless, if a dissimilar metal is present, with a lower
electropositivity, hydrogen will be released from water and the iron
will be oxidized.

Yes, you could in theory make a car that uses iron as its fuel,
generating hydrogen along the way. But iron is more expensive than the
equivalent quantity of oil.

Ships are often protected from corrosion by having pieces of metal
that are *more* electropositive than iron attached to their hulls.
Aluminum is often used. The aluminum gets oxidized, and has to be
replaced periodically. The steel hull becomes the cathode of the
process, and is not oxidized.

Maybe the Original Poster of this thread should do the same kind of
thing. Attach pieces of aluminum to the inside of his tank, and
replace them from time to time.

      dow




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