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Craftsman style passive solar

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Posted by v8z on September 24, 2010, 9:12 pm
 
Just thought the regulars might like to see what we built - a passive solar
home with Craftsman styling in northeast Ohio.

www.mildevco.net/house2

House is approx 2600 sq.ft.  / 4950 sq. ft. conditioned space incl. basement
R-24 ICF walk-out basement, R-38 SIP 1st floor walls, R-45/R-50 roof
(densepack cellulose in 2x12 cavities/blown-in on flats)
Energy Star 5+ / HERS index 50
all ES appliances, 98% efficient NG furnace, all CFL/TFL lighting, windows
Pella Pro-Line w/ Cardinal IG LoE-1778 3rd surface w/ argon SHGC.63 U-factor
0.27
Subfloor in whole south half of the house was stepped down by 1-1/2" to
accept 1-7/8 of gypcrete for thermal mass.  With porcelain tile on top, it
matches height with the 3/4 solid hardwood on the north half ( also thermal
mass)

Total energy consumption $920 Aug09 - Aug10 with full-time engineering
office operating (2x PC's, lighting, etc. 5 days/week and many weekends
 >:< )

Just goes to show you that not all passive solar homes have to look like
concrete boxes



Posted by Josepi on September 25, 2010, 3:46 am
 
I thought long and hard about using hydronic heating on my main floor. I
decided against it due to complexity and lack of information available to
me. I went to an air handler and hydronic in the basement floor. I am glad
we do not live on a ceramic floor everywhere. I like it but only in certain
parts.

What were your main factors for doing the hydronic on the upper and not a
central air handling system?



Just thought the regulars might like to see what we built - a passive solar
home with Craftsman styling in northeast Ohio.

www.mildevco.net/house2

House is approx 2600 sq.ft.  / 4950 sq. ft. conditioned space incl. basement
R-24 ICF walk-out basement, R-38 SIP 1st floor walls, R-45/R-50 roof
(densepack cellulose in 2x12 cavities/blown-in on flats)
Energy Star 5+ / HERS index 50
all ES appliances, 98% efficient NG furnace, all CFL/TFL lighting, windows
Pella Pro-Line w/ Cardinal IG LoE-1778 3rd surface w/ argon SHGC.63 U-factor
0.27
Subfloor in whole south half of the house was stepped down by 1-1/2" to
accept 1-7/8 of gypcrete for thermal mass.  With porcelain tile on top, it
matches height with the 3/4 solid hardwood on the north half ( also thermal
mass)

Total energy consumption $920 Aug09 - Aug10 with full-time engineering
office operating (2x PC's, lighting, etc. 5 days/week and many weekends
 >:< )

Just goes to show you that not all passive solar homes have to look like
concrete boxes





Posted by v8z on September 25, 2010, 4:15 am
 
Actually, there is no hydronic - its a purely passive system.  The gypcrete
is there as thermal mass.  The winter sun shining in the windows hits the
earth-tone tile and the heat is stored in the mass of the floor (+ the stone
fireplace surround, and 5/8 wallboard), slowly releasing overnight after the
sun goes down.  In the center of the house is a two story great room that
allows for good circulation of convection currents, aided by a 68" energy
star rated ceiling fan that moves gobs of air.




Posted by Josepi on September 25, 2010, 4:34 am
 What is the source of heat for braving the weather in Ohio's winters then?


Actually, there is no hydronic - its a purely passive system.  The gypcrete
is there as thermal mass.  The winter sun shining in the windows hits the
earth-tone tile and the heat is stored in the mass of the floor (+ the stone
fireplace surround, and 5/8 wallboard), slowly releasing overnight after the
sun goes down.  In the center of the house is a two story great room that
allows for good circulation of convection currents, aided by a 68" energy
star rated ceiling fan that moves gobs of air.





Posted by v8z on September 25, 2010, 4:07 pm
 

98% efficient Trane Natural Gas forced air furnace combined with a Trane
air-air heat pump - heat pump supplies heat down to outside temp of around
35-40F, then two-stage furnace takes over.  We used 94.7 MCF total for the
year Aug-Aug. and that includes hot water and cooking too.  Heat pump
provides cooling and dehumidification when absolutely necessary in summer -
mostly we let the house draw cool air up from lower levels by opening window
upstairs and in the basement at night and closing it up to keep the cool in
during the day.

I have plans to add a solar thermal system with a small PV panel and 12V
circulating pump in the spring.  The outbuilding has enough roof area facing
south for PV when prices become more attractive.



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