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Flat plate collectors for space heating? - Page 2

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Posted by DJ on December 14, 2005, 12:57 am
 

meshach@allstream.net wrote:

The "quick and dirty" rule of thumb is one 4x8 panel per 250 square
feet of living space.


heating. Generally, though, after space heating, the biggest load dump
is into the domestic hot water, and then into a pool if there is one,
otherwise, just into a ground-radiating element.


That's a fair bit of footage! Might want to consider passing a couple
on to other members of your family... Christmas is coming, after all
;-).

DJ


Posted by SJC on December 14, 2005, 1:06 am
 
Lots of people in California have natural gas forced air furnaces.
I have thought about a solar thermal addition to the air ducts using
a liquid to air heat exchanger like the ones offered by Magicaire.
http://www.magicaire.com/index.htm
This way, during cloudy weather you could still use the furnace,
but on the sunny winter days in S Cal you could gather and store
heat for home heating.


meshach@allstream.net wrote:

The "quick and dirty" rule of thumb is one 4x8 panel per 250 square
feet of living space.


heating. Generally, though, after space heating, the biggest load dump
is into the domestic hot water, and then into a pool if there is one,
otherwise, just into a ground-radiating element.


That's a fair bit of footage! Might want to consider passing a couple
on to other members of your family... Christmas is coming, after all
;-).

DJ


Posted by Anthony Matonak on December 14, 2005, 3:10 am
 SJC wrote:


Or you could build solar air heating panels and just duct the hot
air in or around the furnace intake. Much cheaper than water heating.

Anthony

Posted by SJC on December 14, 2005, 4:56 pm
 
SJC wrote:


Or you could build solar air heating panels and just duct the hot
air in or around the furnace intake. Much cheaper than water heating.

Anthony

That sounds good, but I am not sure it would do the trick at 4 am
when it is 30f outside. I like the idea of heat storage in a thermal
mass.

Posted by Gary on December 14, 2005, 5:09 pm
 SJC wrote:

Air systems can, of course, have storage, but then they tend to get about as
complicated
as water systems.

If you only have a modest amount of collector area (say as much as 20% of the
floor area of the space to be heated), then you can usually put the heat
directly into the house and let the house thermal mass carry some heat
over into the night time.  In other words, by letting the house thermal mass
heat up to
the high end of the comfort zone during the day, you can store some heat
for the evening.  Makes a nice simple system.

--


Gary

www.BuildItSolar.com
gary@BuildItSolar.com
"Build It Yourself" Solar Projects









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