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Fluidyne well pump (5m)

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Posted by Morris Dovey on September 30, 2009, 8:24 pm
 
I've been tinkering with fluidynes (there's some background info on-line
at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/  for anyone who might be
interested) and last night I made a conceptual sketch of a fluidyne well
pump and thought I'd post it, hoping that folks here might be able to
spot at least obvious problems.

I've drawn it to scale, with a 100 mm bore fluidyne engine - and with 50
mm water pipe extending to a depth of 5 m. I've uploaded the sketch to
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/5mPump.jpg  and plan to
rework as needed (your critique will help!) and incorporate into a web
page if/when I can arrive at something that should work. Please keep in
mind that I'm not a pump expert but am eager to learn. :)

The check valves are located halfway between the surface and the bottom
of the well pipe, with the hope that this arrangement will help avoid
pulling sand/rocks into the check valves.

The loop of pipe on the pump side is an attempt to avoid drawing air
into the engine if/when the well pipe drains.

Your comments will be much appreciated!

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Morris Dovey on October 3, 2009, 4:24 pm
 
Morris Dovey wrote:


It would seem that no one has spotted any obvious problems, so I cleaned
up the drawing a bit, and incorporated it into a new web page at

    http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/5mPump.html

with some descriptive info and advance credit for the group who'll be
doing the work of building and installing the first one. When they
become available I'll add photos and installation/operation notes.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Axel Grease on October 11, 2009, 7:22 pm
 
I looked at your parabolic mirror on <
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Heat.html  >

What kind of clear cover will protect the mirror from dust, rain, bird
droppings, errant children and their toys but also permit a sufficiently
high transmission of light to the mirror?
Axel





Posted by Axel Grease on October 11, 2009, 7:35 pm
 
I looked at your parabolic mirror on <
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Heat.html  >

What kind of clear cover will protect the mirror from dust, rain, bird
droppings, errant children and their toys but also permit a sufficiently
high transmission of light to the mirror?
Axel



/



Posted by Morris Dovey on October 11, 2009, 7:25 pm
 Axel Grease wrote:

Good question. In my area dust, snow, high winds, and hail are the
problems of greatest interest, and I've given serious thought to a
"mirror garage" into which the mirror can be retracted when it might be
at risk.

These things need to be well away from children - to protect the
children rather than the collector. The danger of severe burns and
damage to eyesight makes concentrators a bad choice where children will
be in close proximity.

At http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/HTAbsorber/  you can see
one of my attempts to deal with the "bright" problem, but that solution
actually worsens the burn potential.

I think that many commercial installations simply leave the mirror
unprotected, rotate them out of the weather when necessary, and do
periodic off-hour cleanings.

So far, the birds seem to prefer my car to the collector as the
dive-bombing target of choice. :(

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

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