Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

Greenhouse wall bubbles

register ::  Login Password  :: Lost Password?
Posted by garyb31 on April 25, 2006, 7:56 pm
 
I keep hearing a lot about greenhouses that use bubbles at night for
insulation but I can't find any detailed information about it. I am
building a house and in the planning stage decided to build a
greenhouse. I was originally going to build a kit using polycarb. Now
after reading about the bubbles I think I would rather do that. Would
something like this work to enclose an inground pool? How about a
combination greenhouse and pool enclosure? Are there any companies that
sell systems for the bubbles or maybe plans to build it? Thanks.


Posted by Gary on April 25, 2006, 9:48 pm
 
garyb31@gmail.com wrote:

There are a couple links to "bubble" sites on this page:
http://www.builditsolar.com/Experimental/experimental.htm
Just search down the page for "bubble"

There is also a Yahoo discussion group (SolaRoof?) on bubble insulation.

I know little about it, but I don't see offhand why it would not work for pool
enclosure.  The bubbles don't have a very long life in warm air -- so that might
be a problem.  Others may know a lot more.

Gary

--


Gary

www.BuildItSolar.com
gary@BuildItSolar.com
"Build It Yourself" Solar Projects









----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com  The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----

Posted by SGBotsford on May 2, 2006, 10:07 pm
 I have had some discussions with HR of solar bubble 'fame' in the UK.
He is convinced that the bubbles don't insulate very much, and that
Ross Elliot's success with his greenhouse in Ottawa are due mostly to
an immense water reservoir for the greenhouse acting as a thermal
leveler.

I'm currently not convinced by either side's arguments, and need to
make some experiments.


Posted by nicksanspam on May 2, 2006, 10:37 pm
 

Who's HR? It depends on their size and temperature. Tiny cold bubbles
(1/16" diam at a 50 F mean temp) have about US R3 per inch, according
to John Groh's measurements in Arizona.

Nick


This Thread
Bookmark this thread:
 
 
 
 
 
 
  •  
  • Subject
  • Author
  • Date
please rate this thread