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Heat Exchanger for Gas Clothes Dryer

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Posted by Jim O'R on September 26, 2005, 12:48 am
 
        
I have a very well insullated house.  In addition, the house faces south
and i have a lot of south facing windows.  About 40% of my gas bill is for
my clothes dryer.  Years ago I saw a heat exchanger that you could put in
the exhaust pipe.  It didn't seem very efficient at the time.  Are there
any new models/designs that are availaable?

Posted by Solar Flare on September 26, 2005, 12:54 am
 
You wouldn't be able to deal with all that humidity unless you have a heat
exhanger in the circuit. You will then have a clogging problem from all that
clothes lint.

Disconnect your dryer outlet for a few laods and see. Keep the duster handy
for the next few months.



I have a very well insullated house.  In addition, the house faces south
and i have a lot of south facing windows.  About 40% of my gas bill is for
my clothes dryer.  Years ago I saw a heat exchanger that you could put in
the exhaust pipe.  It didn't seem very efficient at the time.  Are there
any new models/designs that are availaable?



Posted by Steve Spence on September 26, 2005, 1:04 am
 Solar Flare wrote:

DO NOT DISCONNECT THE DRYER OUTLET ON A GAS DRYER. Can you say CO
poisoning and death?


--
Steve Spence
Dir., Green Trust, http://www.green-trust.org
Contributing Editor, http://www.off-grid.net
http://www.rebelwolf.com/essn.html

Posted by Solar Flare on September 26, 2005, 3:05 am
 Good point!   I haven't run a gas dryer yet. I do run my gas stove indoors
all the time though.


Solar Flare wrote:

DO NOT DISCONNECT THE DRYER OUTLET ON A GAS DRYER. Can you say CO
poisoning and death?


--
Steve Spence
Dir., Green Trust, http://www.green-trust.org
Contributing Editor, http://www.off-grid.net
http://www.rebelwolf.com/essn.html



Posted by daestrom on September 28, 2005, 12:35 am
 

A problem I have with my clothes dryer is that the exhaust runs through my
attic to an outside wall.  In the winter, the exhaust pipe (4" thin-wall
duct) is cooled by the cold air in the attic.  The moisture from the
clothing condenses and wets the inside walls.  Then the lint sticks to it
like glue.

Have to go up there and 'ram-rod' the piping each spring to clear out the
lint.  This year I layered some extra fiberglass over this (un-faced) to see
if that might help the situation.

Point is, removing heat from the exhaust will cause some condensation.  And
wet lint is troublesome to keep cleared away.

daestrom



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