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Heat Exchanger for Gas Clothes Dryer - Page 3

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Posted by Gary on September 29, 2005, 10:54 pm
 
daestrom wrote:

How about putting a filter in ahead of the heat exchanger and in a
convenient place (like in the laundry room) where it can be cleaned
easily and frequently?  Maybe a filter with quite a bit of cross
sectional area and washable?

--


Gary

www.BuildItSolar.com
gary@BuildItSolar.com
"Build It Yourself" Solar Projects









Posted by daestrom on September 30, 2005, 11:50 pm
 


Yeah, I was thinking that too.  Need much better filtration than what the
'standard' dryer outlet has.  And to keep the backpressure at a minimum, yes
a larger area.  Maybe even a furnace filter (a washable version).

Might have to run some numbers and see how much heat we're talking about,
see what it's worth to me ;-)

daestrom



Posted by Solar Flare on October 1, 2005, 3:20 am
 My electric dryer runs 4800 watts input plus the motor on a cyclic basis.
There should be a way to extract some heat and/or moisture out of it.
 The moisture may be hard to get rid of though.



Yeah, I was thinking that too.  Need much better filtration than what the
'standard' dryer outlet has.  And to keep the backpressure at a minimum, yes
a larger area.  Maybe even a furnace filter (a washable version).

Might have to run some numbers and see how much heat we're talking about,
see what it's worth to me ;-)

daestrom




Posted by Paul on October 1, 2005, 4:59 pm
 

  They make desiccant wheels for dehumidification. If you could somehow use
the dry side of the wheel to capture the filtered hot moist air and dry it
with the
hot dry furnace air, maybe you would recapture some of that latent heat.
That would mean only drying clothes when you needed the heat though.
http://www.semcoinc.com/Products.nsf/o/74FE22C4499EB0AB86256DC700649ADA?EditDocument  



Posted by Cosmopolite on October 1, 2005, 6:50 pm
 Solar Flare wrote:


   When we first bought our house, it had an electric dryer which had a
heat exchanger at the bottom. It was a series of 1" vertical aluminum
tubes where the warm moist air went through and a drip pan under these.
the inlet air flowed over the outside of the tubes. The condensed water
trapped the lint.
   My wife always forgot to empty the pan after every load and it often
overflowed, so her mother bought a conventional dryer for us. Bad move
in hindsight.


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