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Posted by Morris Dovey on June 18, 2007, 11:36 pm
 
I just shipped my first three solar panels out-of-state (to Oklahoma).
Probably not as a big deal to anyone else as it is to me, but it's a
milestone event to this builder.

I realized as I wrote that that I may not have posted a link to a web
page with photos of a pair of passive solar air heating panels. The
page has a couple of photos taken during the build process, and a heap
more of the installation in a new building. If you're interested,
there's a link below. These panels were installed in the first week of
April, and even that late in the season they could "blow your hair
back" - that is, if you have hair to be blown back. :-)

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/SC_Madison.html



Posted by Anthony Matonak on June 19, 2007, 2:54 am
 
Morris Dovey wrote:
...

How do you deal with the heat when it's not heating season?

Anthony

Posted by Morris Dovey on June 19, 2007, 5:05 am
 Anthony Matonak wrote:
| Morris Dovey wrote:

|| These panels were installed in the first week of
|| April, and even that late in the season they could "blow your hair
|| back" - that is, if you have hair to be blown back. :-)
|| http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/SC_Madison.html
|
| How do you deal with the heat when it's not heating season?

It's fairly easy to discard excess heat during the off-season. In
early April the output was dropping off fairly rapidly (judging from
the panel installed in my shop). I haven't visited the site since
about a week after installation, but expect that the building isn't
receiving as much heat from the panels as flows in through open doors
and windows.

The owner is talking with his local REC (Rural Electrical Cooperative)
in an effort to have them install monitoring/recording equipment, and
I'm encouraging that to the extent of offering to provide a PC so that
the data (both accumulated and real-time) can be made generally
available online. If that happens, you can depend on a timely
announcement (and URL) here. :-)

I'm particularly eager to see how these panels perform during the
heating season since I'd guesstimated the output rate to be about half
of peak at installation (shortly after the vernal equinox). The higher
winter output rate will, of course, trade off against fewer collection
hours. In any event, I think the recorded data might well be
interesting to all involved.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/



Posted by Wayne Langille on June 19, 2007, 2:53 pm
 Congrats on selling your panels, how many have you built and sold so far. I
think the high temp in your panels is very high and you are loosing a lot of
heat out through the glass, they would be more effecient to have heat
comming out at 100deg, thats what i set mine for, but get up to 115 deg on
good days. I used plywood for my first ones, but went with all aluminum,
easier and quicker to work with and cost is not much more. For venting in
summer i block the out let pipe and vent the heat to outside, so it takes
moist air out of basement, so my panels work all year around. I have built
and sold 12, have more to build this fall. 5000-6000 btus per hour on good
day.  Wayne


Posted by Morris Dovey on June 20, 2007, 12:50 pm
 Wayne Langille wrote:
| Congrats on selling your panels, how many have you built and sold
| so far. I think the high temp in your panels is very high and you
| are loosing a lot of heat out through the glass, they would be more
| effecient to have heat comming out at 100deg, thats what i set mine
| for, but get up to 115 deg on good days. I used plywood for my
| first ones, but went with all aluminum, easier and quicker to work
| with and cost is not much more. For venting in summer i block the
| out let pipe and vent the heat to outside, so it takes moist air
| out of basement, so my panels work all year around. I have built
| and sold 12, have more to build this fall. 5000-6000 btus per hour

Thanks! This customer agreed to be a "guinea pig" for a set of changes
I'd been working on - and the highest observed discharge temperature
since installation has been 115F. Even with the higher temperatures of
the previous models, primary losses weren't back through the glazing,
and those were significantly reduced by filling the gap between the
panel and the rough opening with foamed-in-place (aerosol) insulation.

Initially, I focused on absorber/heat exchanger performance - and once
I was satisfied that I was on the right track there I shifted focus to
improving airflow through the box. The folded plenum of the Type 3
panels does present some interesting challenges in this area. The
Madison County installation incorporated three important changes to
improve the airflow, and with the airflow improvements the temperature
dropped fairly dramatically.

I'll probably continue using wood. I've considered a number of other
materials (including aluminum and even s/s) I made the decision to
stay with hardwood boxes with ply internal partitions - at least until
I decide that the design has long-term stability.

I've thought about the outdoor venting, but haven't found any way to
do that without sacrificing something that I'd rather not. Instead,
I've been working on a solar-powered "double-fluidyne" refrigeration
device that may prove scalable for central air-conditioning. I prefer
this approach to summer comfort because it provides temperatures
considerably lower than the outdoor ambient provided by a solar
chimney.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/



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