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Increase in collector temps due to snow relection? - Page 3

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Posted by daestrom on December 12, 2005, 10:35 pm
 


Indeed, there was a plan to melt iceburgs from the shipping lanes by
spraying them with soot to lower their albedo and enhance melting.  Actually
worked in the trial run for a few days, then the 'burgs turned over, washing
off the soot and exposing white ice.


Also doesn't work well in the 'snowbelt' along the eastern shore of the
Great Lakes.  Snows so often, the ashes get covered over with fresh snowfall
within a day.

daestrom



Posted by daestrom on December 12, 2005, 10:41 pm
 


No, but it does discuss corrections for albedo.  The numbers used as given
were for green vegetation.  The appendix gives a formula to apply a
correction.  Snow can have a much higher albedo (reflectivity), as much as
90% in a wide open field covered in fresh snow, compared to 20% for green
vegetation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albedo#Snow

Add to this the relatively low angle of the sun in the winter sky, and a
vertical collector can gather quite a bit of energy from the reflected snow
without sacrificing much of the direct beam sunlight (noon time the sun is
only ~18 degrees above the horizon at 41N on 12/21).

daestrom



Posted by SolarFlare on December 13, 2005, 12:51 am
 I have some landscaping modifications to do on my new
house design then....LOL

Actually is should work very well with my design. Just
have to slope the flat plain spot a bit more then.


message
message

reflected

thermal

transparency

reflected

numbers used as given

formula to apply a

(reflectivity), as much as

compared to 20% for green

the winter sky, and a

from the reflected snow

(noon time the sun is


Posted by nicksanspam on December 13, 2005, 11:02 am
 

That works, for large values of 18.

Nick


Posted by daestrom on December 13, 2005, 8:32 pm
 

Damn!!!  I'm always screwing up that calculations!  You're right nick, on
12/21 the sun is 25.5 degrees above the horizon (90 - (41+23.5)).

Thanks
daestrom



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