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Is anybody successfully generating electricity from solar generated steam? - Page 2

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Posted by Rick... (The other Rick) on September 9, 2008, 9:57 am
 
On Fri, 5 Sep 2008 18:36:16 -0700 (PDT), gary@builditsolar.com wrote:


Alicante).

day, and I will need

20 square meters in

generator, any power that we

will be used to heat the

the heat generated is a

pressure pipes to be used.

depending on the mirror

thesehttp://www.greensteamengine.com/index.htmlcoupled  to

Hi, I have to admit that I'm not too concerned with efficiency.

I describe myself as a born techy, basically I want to see if I can do it (as
cheap as possible).

I have discovered that I need to learn a LOT about steam boilers and engines,
but heck, the day you
stop learning things as the day you die <Grin>

I feel that one of the reasons that PV systems are so popular is that they are
basically fit and
forget. I want something to fiddle with <Grin>

I have already had great fun building a small prototype (1 sq M) system and
working out the linkages
and control gear, not to mention the tracker system. Unfortunately here in the
UK we have had a
lousy summer, so I have been unable to get any temperature data

I have decided to spend the winter learning about steam.


Rick... (The other Rick)

Science and sound engineering will always prevail in the end
"for nature cannot be fooled" [Feynman]

Posted by Morris Dovey on September 9, 2008, 10:11 am
 
Rick... (The other Rick) wrote:


You might consider a Stirling-powered generator. Waste heat can still be
used to heat home and pool. You might even consider ways to use your
pool as a heat storage device for home heating...

(It's always fun to suggest projects for other people. <grin>)

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Rick... (The other Rick) on September 9, 2008, 10:56 am
 

I thought about a Stirling powered system, but as I understand it, while a
Stirling engine can run
at high speed, it lacks torque. While a steam engine can run at low speed, it
has lots of torque.

Rick... (The other Rick)

Science and sound engineering will always prevail in the end
"for nature cannot be fooled" [Feynman]

Posted by Morris Dovey on September 9, 2008, 11:18 am
 Rick... (The other Rick) wrote:


I think that may be a characteristic of a very small engines. I've been
working on fluidynes (liquid-piston Stirling-cycle engines) with cycle
frequencies in the 1 to 1.5 Hz range and no shortage of power.

My understanding is that Stirling power was one of the options seriously
considered for Fulton's "Clermont" side-wheel vessel.

I encourage you to to research a bit more - and discuss your project
with local Stirling club members.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Rick... (The other Rick) on September 9, 2008, 11:35 am
 

Ok, will do.

Sigh, yet more stuff to learn.....

Rick... (The other Rick)

Science and sound engineering will always prevail in the end
"for nature cannot be fooled" [Feynman]

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