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Physics help (again) please - energy given up at reflection

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Posted by Morris Dovey on June 8, 2009, 11:42 pm
 
When a radiant is reflected, there appears that some of its energy is
given up to the reflecting surface.

Can anyone tell me what the variables are and what is needed to
determine the proportion of energy absorbed/reflected in terms of those
variables?

I'd also appreciate vocabulary (so I can do productive searches), links
to good info, and/or formulas I can use to model behavior of various
reflector configurations.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Morris Dovey on June 8, 2009, 11:52 pm
 
Morris Dovey wrote:

Sorry, I'm not a good poofreader.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Curbie on June 18, 2009, 10:16 pm
 Morris,

I assume your question is:
If the reflectance of a surface is (say) 94%, what happens to the
other 6%?
I assume it is absorbed as heat, but I really don't know.

I can think of two places you might get your question answered.
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
Questions submitted here:
http://www.nrel.gov/webmaster.html

Or

ReflecTech
http://www.reflectechsolar.com/index.html
Reflective film designed by
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
Questions submitted here:
info@reflectechsolar.com

I've never had any luck getting answers from NREL (must be a busy
bunch) but can't hurt to try.

Good luck.

Curbie



Posted by Morris Dovey on June 18, 2009, 11:32 pm
 Curbie wrote:

I know what happens to the light that isn't reflected (ohmic heating is
the tech term) but don't know how to calculate it...

And is, for example, reflectivity at all dependent on angle of
incidence? Since energy is given up to the surface, does the
wavelength/frequency shift? Lotsa questions, and I'm not finding many
answers.

I'll visit the reflectechsolar site, but I'm looking for more general
answers to very basic physics questions than I think they're likely to
provide.

Thanks for the links!

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Curbie on June 19, 2009, 3:44 am
 Morris,

It never hurts to ask, the worst that can happen is they don't answer,
even if that happens you won't be any farther away from an answer than
you are right now. Who knows maybe they'll answer, if they do, it
seems to me that you can depend on the results.

Curbie



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