Hybrid Car – More Fun with Less Gas

Re: Radiant Floor Heat Water Heater ? - Page 4

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Posted by News on December 8, 2003, 4:30 pm
 

Yes. Depending how much it is pressurised.  But let's not be sidetracked.

Pedantic Nick comes in...:-) Well when the flue gasses are dropped below 54C
"condensing" operation starts, getting heavier as the temperature drops.
That better?



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Posted by Nick Pine on December 8, 2003, 8:28 pm
 



Posted by News on December 9, 2003, 12:33 am
 

Give us a shot at it then.


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Posted by daestrom on December 9, 2003, 1:54 am
 

starts,

How about,

"When the flue gasses are cooled below 54C, a significant portion of the
water vapour in the gasses is condensed, thus contributing the latent heat
of vaporization to the total heat added to the water in the boiler.  While a
portion of the vapour obviously could be condensed with higher temperatures,
by lowering flue gasses to 54C, a larger fraction is condensed within the
limits of the boiler's heat-exchanger and therefore more total heat absorbed
from the flue gasses before they are discharged to the environment."

If your high-efficiency forced air furnace worked with an air return
temperature a lot higher thann it does, it wouldn't be 'high-efficiency'
since a lot of water vapour in the flue gasses would not be condensed.  In
order to get the same kind of efficiency with a water heating 'boiler', one
needs a section of the flue to be cooled by a rather 'cool' return water
(say, 54C or 130F).  If the return water from the heating loop to the
'boiler' was a lot warmer (say 180F or 82C), then a lot of the water vapour
in the flue gas would *not* condense and its heat of vaporization lost.

The problem is the water vapour in the flue gasses is mixed with air and CO2
so it doesn't just all condense at 100C/212F.

daestrom



Posted by offgridman@cs.com on December 11, 2003, 4:04 pm
 You guys keep using 54C what ever happened to 100C?
Offgridman

daestrom wrote:



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