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Re: dehumidifiers - Page 2

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Posted by on June 20, 2007, 11:58 am
 
On Jun 19, 9:48 pm, "Proctologically Violated©®"

My dehumidifier does "throw" heat while running. It is in my basement
and there are no windows that would support an AC unit. I believe if I
had to do it again, a window unit would be the best of both worlds. I
would have to modify a casemount window to accomodate an AC unit.
==========================

Or get a mini-split.
They have them for as little as $00/9,000 BTU units, 10-11 EER.  You'll
need a guy w/ A/C gauges etc to connect/charge the condensor to the coil.
Many of these mini's also have heatpump function.

Or the portable Amana's, etc, about $50 now.  If demudification is your
primary concern, you get moderate A/C for free!
Beats heat in the summer.
--
------
Mr. P.V.'d  (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY

Stop Corruption in Congress & Send the Ultimate Message:
Absolutely Vote, but NOT for a Democrat or a Republican.
Ending Corruption in Congress is the *Single Best Way*
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entropic3.14decay at optonline2.718 dot net; remove pi and e to reply--ie,
all d'numbuhs





Posted by DT on June 21, 2007, 1:59 pm
 


I got a 12,000 btu mini-split on eBay last summer and installed it myself. Many
are precharged and as long as the line lengths work for you, can be installed
easily. I'm very happy with it, and with careful positioning it does almost all
of my 1st floor (I have a fairly open plan home).

I had to install custom line lengths, so I needed to cut and re-flare the line
sets. I do have a vacuum pump and evacuated and leak-checked my lines, although
the procedure that is outlined in the installation manual just used a timed
blow-down based on the length of the line.

--
Dennis


Posted by on June 21, 2007, 6:47 pm
 Interesting.
Where did you get your A/C tools from?  Straightforward to use?

I thought the lines had to be hard brazed/soldered.
Isn't flaring asking for trouble?

I would love to be able to do this myself.  Really want to put the whole
house on a bunch of minisplits.  Got central A/C w/ essentially zero zoning,
and it's killing me.
--
------
Mr. P.V.'d  (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY

Stop Corruption in Congress & Send the Ultimate Message:
Absolutely Vote, but NOT for a Democrat or a Republican.
Ending Corruption in Congress is the *Single Best Way*
to Materially Improve Your Family's Life.
The Solution is so simple--and inexpensive!

entropic3.14decay at optonline2.718 dot net; remove pi and e to reply--ie,
all d'numbuhs



Posted by DT on June 21, 2007, 8:18 pm
 entropic3.14decay@optonline2.718.net says...

Flared line sets are the norm for mini-splits, every one I looked at came that
way. The higher priced ones may have dry-break quick connects, although the
flared sets are also called 'quick connect' by many sellers so you really need
to ask questions about ones you are interested in. Mine has been running a year
and a half, fine so far, the brand name is Celiera.

I can't see any differences between the different units I was shopping for. The
wall units are identical, they all use compressors from the same 1 or 2
manufacturers, the controls work the same, etc. The refrigerant is stored in
the outdoor unit, and will purge and fill a specified maximum line length
(usually 24 feet or so), if you need longer lines, you will need a pro to fill
it and add more for any of the units.

You don't need any HVAC tools if you are willing to go with the
standard installation method. You hook up the lines, look your line length up
in a chart, set the valves in a certain sequence and finally purge the line-set
 and indoor unit by opening the shut off valve a quarter turn for X number of
seconds. This is calculated to purge out the air, but shut off just as the
refrigerant comes out.

Not a precise method in my mind (Hell, I'm not even sure if it's legal anymore,
but that's the factory method) so I evacuated everything and filled into the
evacuated system. I would suggest that is always a *better* way to go, since
then you can be assured the flares are OK if they hold vacuum. I do have a
lot of experience with flaring lines for a variety of exotic fluids so I am
pretty confident with it. You could also add Voishan washers under the flares
if you wanted, but soft copper seals quite well.

My vacuum pump is just a small Kinney lab pump, but HVAC pumps are readily
available and are not too expensive. Many people use salvaged refigerator
compressors for occasional HVAC use. The refrigerant on my unit uses the same
fittings as R12, standard 1/4" flare, so it is easy to hook up. The new higher
SEER may use a different fitting, they have a different refrigerant.

Dennis


Posted by Nick Pine on June 20, 2007, 9:10 am
 

Sure, with dry outdoor air, but this version uses no electrical power:


And this version would only require sun, vs dry outdoor air:



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