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Re: frugal heating this winter?? - Page 9

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Posted by zap on November 10, 2004, 6:19 pm
 


Even you should be able to bullshit your way out
of your predicament better than that pathetic effort.

Obviously not.



Posted by News on November 11, 2004, 5:53 pm
 

..

Oh good, an echo.




Posted by Stuart Brown on October 9, 2004, 7:33 am
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Rod Speed wrote:


I'm glad to see that you have made  places like Canada and Sweden a
little  bit more engineered for the colder weather.   The trend is to go
toward R2000 homes.  Do a google on  "R2000" and "Regulations" or go to :
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/r-2000/english/public/index.cfm?PrintView=N&Text=N

You will get a fair number of pages, the main content of which, is that
you should seal the leaks, ensure that once your home is airtight,
ensure that you have a good heat exchanger (or Heat Recovery
Ventilator)  to allow fresh air into the home for breathing, ensure that
there is a positive pressure in the home prior to opening and closing
doors, use a leak free air lock for entering and exiting the home, and
other fairly important things.  The insulation R value of the walls and
roof would  be commensurate with the weather demands of the local area
There is one guy who lives here in Saskatoon with an R-80  value in his
roof and R60 in his walls.

Some R2000 homes have the combustion air for the furnace come  from
outside through a heat exchanger as well.  Boiler people would recognize
the benefits of an economizer which utilizes exhaust gases in a heat
exchange format to extract as many BTU's out of the fuel as possible.
Some people use the geothermal heat pumps up here to help with reducing
the cost of heating your home in -40 weather (Farenheit/ Celsius .. They
are both the same at -40!)  


This is just my 2 cents worth.

Stu Brown
Engineering technologist





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Rod Speed wrote:<br>
  <pre wrap=""><a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E"
wrote in message
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
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    <pre wrap="">Rod Speed <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E"
    </pre>
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      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre wrap="">Serendipity  <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E"
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    </blockquote>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <blockquote type="cite">
          <pre wrap="">...eliminate air leaks.
          </pre>
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  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
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        <pre wrap="">These might be 30-50% of a typical fuel bill.
        </pre>
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  </blockquote>
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      <pre wrap="">But hardly ever are in modern houses.
      </pre>
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  <pre wrap=""><!---->
  </pre>
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    <pre wrap="">Modern houses seem to add insulation faster than airtightness
(with some exceptions, eg Sweden and Canada), which lowers
the overall heat loss, but makes air leakage a larger fraction.
    </pre>
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But hardly ever gets to the level you claimed in a modern house.
  </pre>
</blockquote>
I'm glad to see that you have made&nbsp; places like Canada and Sweden a
little&nbsp; bit more engineered for the colder weather.&nbsp;&nbsp; The trend
is to
go toward R2000 homes.&nbsp; Do a google on&nbsp; "R2000" and "Regulations" or go
to :<br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
href="http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/r-2000/english/public/index.cfm?PrintView=N&Text=N">http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/r-2000/english/public/index.cfm?PrintView=N&amp;Text=N</a><br>
<br>
You will get a fair number of pages, the main content of which, is that
you should seal the leaks, ensure that once your home is airtight,
ensure that you have a good heat exchanger (or Heat Recovery
Ventilator)&nbsp; to allow fresh air into the home for breathing, ensure
that there is a positive pressure in the home prior to opening and
closing doors, use a leak free air lock for entering and exiting the
home, and other fairly important things.&nbsp; The insulation R value of the
walls and roof would&nbsp; be commensurate with the weather demands of the
local area There is one guy who lives here in Saskatoon with an R-80&nbsp;
value in his roof and R60 in his walls. <br>
<br>
Some R2000 homes have the combustion air for the furnace come&nbsp; from
outside through a heat exchanger as well.&nbsp; Boiler people would
recognize the benefits of an economizer which utilizes exhaust gases in
a heat exchange format to extract as many BTU's out of the fuel as
possible. <br>
Some people use the geothermal heat pumps up here to help with reducing
the cost of heating your home in -40 weather (Farenheit/ Celsius ..
They are both the same at -40!)&nbsp;&nbsp; <br>
<br>
<br>
This is just my 2 cents worth.&nbsp; <br>
<br>
Stu Brown <br>
Engineering technologist<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>

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Posted by News on October 9, 2004, 9:49 am
 


It must be real "cold" air to affect the flame temperature.  In some
instances the colder the better as colder air contains more oxygen, which is
better for combustion.


These are called condensing boilers. From next April In the UK they will
become standard with some exceptions where the exhaust plume will be a
nuisance.


Heat pumps are not cost effective in the UK as yet, being more of fads, and
are the same to run as natural gas.  Cheaper than oil and LPG to run, but
the capital cost of installation is horrendous. They are more efficient when
a bore hole is used than runs very deep.  The extra money spent will pay for
a hell of a lot of oil.



Posted by Anthony Matonak on October 9, 2004, 5:55 pm
 News wrote:

I think it's more an issue that they don't want to draw
the combustion air from the inside of the home as this
would require that air to be replaced with outside cold
air. Taking the combustion air from inside the home can
have danger from backdrafts as well.

Anthony

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