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Posted by Joe Fischer on September 22, 2006, 12:37 am
 


           I thought maybe the inventors names, etc. would
help find more detailed plans on the net.

           The drawing at the top of the Einstein page can
be enlarged, then a download of a hires image is offered,
but I don't know if that will help, it is just a schematic
drawing and probably doesn't even resemble the real
plumbing.

           The servel was heavy, and big, but had a very
small flame, more like a bunsen burner.
           I know it  was heavy, I took the unit out in
one piece and carried the thing to a 3rd floor attic
apartment, and back down 4 months later, and
used it for 5 years.

           Sorry I don't know of any real plans or
any kits being sold.

Joe Fischer


Posted by willbanks on September 22, 2006, 3:58 am
 

I'll check into it.


A simple 'charge-use-charge' system isn't that much of a problem.  Almost
any one who can weld can make one of those.  The trick comes into keeping
the stuff flowing.  I have seen rough drawings of systems which seem to use
nothing more than heat and gravity to run the run.  But this isn't really
the type of project I want to start w/o more than rough drawings.  The parts
could get real expensive in a hurry if its going to involved a lot of
stainless steel welding.



Posted by RamRod Sword of Baal on September 22, 2006, 5:27 pm
 

Ammonia is very efficient when used in a compressor type system, but not
when used in an  absorption type system.

Ammonia is a wonderful refrigerant, but not used in air conditioning
systems, because it is poisonous, it burns and it explodes. The idea of
waking up in a room full of ammonia vapour is something that would terrify
anyone who has worked with ammonia.

When ammonia get in contact with moisture, such as the eyes or lungs, it
turns into a very caustic type substance, causing a great deal of damage.

 Absorption air conditioning systems use water as the refrigerant, and
lithium bromide as the absorber. They can be quite temperamental
systems.They require the system to work under a fairly deep vacuum.

 Absorption refrigeration is not very efficient compared to compressor type
of refrigeration.


FYI
http://www.fredonia.edu/facilitiesmanagement/RefrigChiller.htm





Posted by no spam on September 22, 2006, 6:54 pm
 
I'm not worried too much about the efficiency because I'd be using 'free'
energy, i.e. solar.



Which is why I'm leaning towards a water heat exchanger.  All the ammonia
would be well away from the house and no way for a major leak to reach the
inside.  You'd have to have the ammonia leak into the cooling water than the
contaminated water to leak into the house.  By that time you'd have a very
diluted ammonia.

I have worked with some 'nasty' chemicals before, things that cause death in
seconds w/ a drop the size of a pin head on the skin, so I have a very
healthy respect for those little warning lables ;)




Which puts it well outside the home builder range.  NH3 on the other hand is
1940's tech so any fairly well equipped modern shop should be able to handle
it.


Again not on my list of problems because even if it is only 50% efficient
I'm still saving money because I'm using free solar power and not high
priced electric to run it.



Posted by SJC on September 22, 2006, 7:16 pm
 It is my understanding that most single stage units like Yazaki use lithium
bromide
and have a COP of around 0.5, but only require maybe 180F to operate. The dual
stage
units can use ammonia and have a COP closer to 1.0, but require higher
temperatures
to operate.


I'm not worried too much about the efficiency because I'd be using 'free'
energy, i.e. solar.



Which is why I'm leaning towards a water heat exchanger.  All the ammonia
would be well away from the house and no way for a major leak to reach the
inside.  You'd have to have the ammonia leak into the cooling water than the
contaminated water to leak into the house.  By that time you'd have a very
diluted ammonia.

I have worked with some 'nasty' chemicals before, things that cause death in
seconds w/ a drop the size of a pin head on the skin, so I have a very
healthy respect for those little warning lables ;)




Which puts it well outside the home builder range.  NH3 on the other hand is
1940's tech so any fairly well equipped modern shop should be able to handle
it.


Again not on my list of problems because even if it is only 50% efficient
I'm still saving money because I'm using free solar power and not high
priced electric to run it.




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