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Posted by Josepi on April 5, 2010, 7:01 pm
 
The loss of investment income, or the cost of loan interest, on the solar PV
installation usually exceeds the payback rate of income from solar PV
installations, on home systems.

The manufacturers aren't usually losing money of the ones that haven't gone
bankrupt or live on Gov. grants trying to produce a product.


dlzc wrote:
I keep seeing this claim,but have a question. How can it be that solar cells
"barely make up the energy cost to form them"? If this is true, wouldn't the
manufacturers be losing money selling them? They have to pay for every unit
of
energy they use to make them. And energy can't be the only cost to
manufacture
them




Posted by Sid9 on April 5, 2010, 8:30 pm
 


You're not up to date on solar cells:

from Wikipedia:

"...Energy payback time and energy returned on energy invested

The energy payback time is the time required to produce an amount of energy
as great as what was consumed during production. The energy payback time is
determined from a life cycle analysis of energy. The energy needed to
produce solar panels is paid back in the first few years of use.[76]

Another key indicator of environmental performance, tightly related to the
energy payback time, is the ratio of electricity generated divided by the
energy required to build and maintain the equipment. This ratio is called
the energy returned on energy invested (EROEI). This should not be confused
with the economic return on investment, which varies according to local
energy prices, subsidies available and metering techniques.

Life-cycle analyses show that the energy intensity of typical solar
photovoltaic technologies is rapidly evolving. In 2000 the energy payback
time was estimated as 8 to 11 years[77], but more recent studies suggest
that technological progress has reduced this to 1.5 to 3.5 years for
crystalline silicon PV systems[71].

Thin film technologies now have energy pay-back times in the range of 1-1.5
years (S.Europe).[71] With lifetimes of such systems of at least 30
years[citation needed], the EROEI is in the range of 10 to 30. They thus
generate enough energy over their lifetimes to reproduce themselves many
times (6-31 reproductions, the EROEI is a bit lower) depending on what type
of material, balance of system (or BOS), and the geographic location of the
system.[78]..."


Posted by Josepi on April 6, 2010, 4:00 am
 Your first paragraph indicates the rest is all a big exageration also.
Your wikipedia article is incorrect.



You're not up to date on solar cells:

from Wikipedia:

"...Energy payback time and energy returned on energy invested

The energy payback time is the time required to produce an amount of energy
as great as what was consumed during production. The energy payback time is
determined from a life cycle analysis of energy. The energy needed to
produce solar panels is paid back in the first few years of use.[76]

Another key indicator of environmental performance, tightly related to the
energy payback time, is the ratio of electricity generated divided by the
energy required to build and maintain the equipment. This ratio is called
the energy returned on energy invested (EROEI). This should not be confused
with the economic return on investment, which varies according to local
energy prices, subsidies available and metering techniques.

Life-cycle analyses show that the energy intensity of typical solar
photovoltaic technologies is rapidly evolving. In 2000 the energy payback
time was estimated as 8 to 11 years[77], but more recent studies suggest
that technological progress has reduced this to 1.5 to 3.5 years for
crystalline silicon PV systems[71].

Thin film technologies now have energy pay-back times in the range of 1-1.5
years (S.Europe).[71] With lifetimes of such systems of at least 30
years[citation needed], the EROEI is in the range of 10 to 30. They thus
generate enough energy over their lifetimes to reproduce themselves many
times (6-31 reproductions, the EROEI is a bit lower) depending on what type
of material, balance of system (or BOS), and the geographic location of the
system.[78]..."



Posted by Sid9 on April 6, 2010, 4:09 am
 

Try backing up you unsupported statement.


Posted by Josepi on April 6, 2010, 4:09 am
 Simple math if you can multiple more than two figures together.



Try backing up you unsupported statement.



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