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Posted by Jean Marc on April 8, 2010, 10:23 am
 

"Jean Marc" <jean-marc.brun> a écrit dans le message de news:
4bbda943$$9843$26a34cc@news.free.fr...

In fact, the problems seem to be more on the political and ethical side than
technical.
(neo colonialism and so on...)

To be discuted on the next summit of the "union pour la méditérannée" in
Cairo, may 25.

http://www.laviedesreseaux.fr/Informez-vous/Actualite/Un-reseau-de-lignes-electriques-sous-la-Mediterranee

Also:
Transgreen





Posted by Morris Dovey on April 8, 2010, 1:25 pm
 
On 4/8/2010 5:23 AM, Jean Marc wrote:

Merci Jean Marc.

Europe and North Africa do have much to offer each other and, as always,
the most worthwhile endeavors depend on the goodwill, long-term vision,
and integrity of the participants.

Imagine, for example, the waste output of a number of large European
cities composted into clean, moisture-retaining topsoil and used to
create/expand agricultural production in currently arid areas.

Even from this far away I see possibilities for many such beneficial
scenarios for people all around the Mediterranean...


So, let's hope the participants recognize that the best way to derive
benefit is to find ways to make benefits available to the others.

One can always hope...

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

Posted by Jean Marc on April 8, 2010, 3:38 pm
 
hpklg7$tta$@speranza.aioe.org...

Again beware of neo colonialism. These countries, even not so advanced,
master quite a lot of techniques, feed their people. And they have their own
pride and independance.
People of Morroco, for example, export their rain-trigger tech to other
countries. And have a valuable agriculture.
The main problem is rain, water. The Draa river's last time to the sea was
sometime around 1960. The river bed is still really impressive, even if
where I crossed it there was water 20 years ago for the last time.
We are using our waste to produce gas and fertiliser (well, not everywhere).
And we tend to produce less and less waste.

Back to the topic, Desertec seems to be a promising (solar thermal) tech,
and will provide cash to the country where it will be built.
Regards
JM



Posted by Josepi on April 8, 2010, 3:59 pm
 What happens when we shade a huge portion of the desert and it starts
growing things we hadn't planned on?

How much environemental impact will this have on our global situation?

Everybody figures it "all just desert" and nobody cares it may be playing a
huge part in out global ecology.

Why would a country, on one continent, care about the energy greed of a
country, already making a mess of their own country, on another continent to
donate away land and possibly suffer environmnetal consequences down the
road?



"Jean Marc" <jean-marc.brun> wrote in message
Again beware of neo colonialism. These countries, even not so advanced,
master quite a lot of techniques, feed their people. And they have their own
pride and independance.
People of Morroco, for example, export their rain-trigger tech to other
countries. And have a valuable agriculture.
The main problem is rain, water. The Draa river's last time to the sea was
sometime around 1960. The river bed is still really impressive, even if
where I crossed it there was water 20 years ago for the last time.
We are using our waste to produce gas and fertiliser (well, not everywhere).
And we tend to produce less and less waste.

Back to the topic, Desertec seems to be a promising (solar thermal) tech,
and will provide cash to the country where it will be built.
Regards
JM




Posted by Jean Marc on April 9, 2010, 6:39 am
 
w3nvn.170206$r7.162994@newsfe05.iad...

It would not be a huge portion. Can you imagine how much energy arrives on 1
km2 when you have 3000-3500 hours a year of full sun. Imagine the voltage
and amp on the cable to take that 1000 km away...
200W/m2, that's 200 MW/ km2.
Sahara is 7.7E6 km2.

I have read that 10% of its area would provide electricity for the whole
world. The _average_ temp in june is around 40°C (not just during the day):
people there would be happy to see _anything_ grow.
In fact, to speak of what I saw, every year people sow there. If it rains,
good, if not, maybe next year...


Nobody cares? Speculation


Not donate, rent. Again, neo colonialism: do you think that these countries
do not have pride in their independance?



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